Natalya Bekhta's monograph on first-person plural narrative is the first book-length account of this innovative form of writing. The study is based on Bekhta's (2016) PhD thesis at the University of Giessen. She has published a series of essays on the topic (Bekhta 2017a, 2017b) and a special issue of Style (Bekhta 2020). In her essays, Bekhta takes exception to earlier work on we-narratives, claiming that only texts with a communal we-voice can properly be called we-narratives. The heavily revised monograph continues to give the communal voice a special status of what she calls “performative” we-narrative, but acknowledges the existence of “indicative” we-narration, in which an “I” narrates the story as spokesperson for a group. Indicative we-narratives are defined as providing “a statement about a certain group,” while performative we-narratives “construct[] a collective subject” (60). In addition, the study under review draws attention to texts...

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