The past decade has seen a proliferation of publications that consider the relationship between the humanities and a rapidly changing environment. This development has in part been shaped by paradigm shifts such as the recent materialist, affective, and posthuman turns. Environment and Narrative, edited by Erin James and Eric Morel, adds to this burgeoning body of work by examining the contribution that narrative approaches make to our understanding of the environment. Continuing James's (2015) earlier work on econarratology, as set out in The Storyworld Accord, the edited volume Environment and Narrative is structured around three prominent directions in econarratology: representation of the nonhuman; narrative ethics, with an understanding of narrative “as a multisided ethical interaction” (8); and cognitive narratology and readerly interaction with narrated storyworlds. Econarratology, as it takes shape in this volume, is understood as “the paired consideration of material environments and their representations and...

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