1-20 of 103 Search Results for

mental illness

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2022) 22 (2): 253–277.
Published: 01 April 2022
...Theresa Tinkle Abstract This article reports on an undergraduate course centered on autobiographies written by people who manage mental illnesses. Students learned about neurodiversity from multiple perspectives, examined social and medical models of mental illness, developed interpretive skills...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2018) 18 (3): 566–572.
Published: 01 October 2018
... in the classroom. mental disability mental illness classroom disclosure stigma rhetorical scaffolding Copyright © 2018 Duke University Press 2018 ...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2015) 15 (3): 421–440.
Published: 01 October 2015
... and the Teaching of Writing remind us, “mental illness remains among the most stigmatized of all kinds of disability. The label carries a stigma with real, material con- sequences too” (Lewiecki-­Wilson and Brueggemann 2008: 134). For these reasons there is cause to assume that many mentally disabled...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2020) 20 (2): 327–347.
Published: 01 April 2020
...: The Challenge of Authentic Intellectual Engagement. Journal of Teaching Writing 23, no. 2: 35 53. Orem, Sarah, and Neil Simpkins. 2015. Weepy Rhetoric, Trigger Warnings, and the Work of Making Mental Illness Visible in the Writing Classroom. Enculturation, 16 December. enculturation.net/weepy- rhetoric...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2022) 22 (2): 309–324.
Published: 01 April 2022
.... One student decided to write about their “experience in a psychiatric hospital and tied it in with the history of treatments for mental illness.” They elaborated: “When I took the class, I had just transferred to Carolina. The decision had a lot to do with mental illness and hospital experience, so...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2004) 4 (2): 331–336.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., either as patients, caregivers, or mental health professionals. Wisker eloquently reminds teachers that students with backgrounds in health care and mental illness may with good reason resist popular feminist interpre- tations of the story, which read the narrator s final acts as a triumph over patri...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2004) 4 (2): 337–343.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., either as patients, caregivers, or mental health professionals. Wisker eloquently reminds teachers that students with backgrounds in health care and mental illness may with good reason resist popular feminist interpre- tations of the story, which read the narrator s final acts as a triumph over patri...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2004) 4 (2): 344–348.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., either as patients, caregivers, or mental health professionals. Wisker eloquently reminds teachers that students with backgrounds in health care and mental illness may with good reason resist popular feminist interpre- tations of the story, which read the narrator s final acts as a triumph over patri...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2004) 4 (2): 323–330.
Published: 01 April 2004
... with backgrounds in health care and mental illness may with good reason resist popular feminist interpre- tations of the story, which read the narrator s final acts as a triumph over patri- archy. In class, Wisker asks students to articulate their responses to Gilman s narrative and respond to other students...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2014) 14 (2): 179–198.
Published: 01 April 2014
... “the student years represent the age of greatest risk of suicide,” she is also writing to encourage “students who struggle with mental illness” to fight against “the lack of understanding . . . from their professors and college administrators; the lack of adequate health insurance...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2021) 21 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 January 2021
... of higher education. We were coming off of a section interrogating mental ill- McDaneld Post- racial Preoccupations 9 ness, in which we read Sylvia Plath s The Bell Jar alongside historical sources discussing the treatment of mental illness in the 1950s and contemporary debates about the roots of mental...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2004) 4 (2): 241–262.
Published: 01 April 2004
... of genteel vulnerability. Sexton s fur coat made her garage suicide at least stylish. But Plath s mental illness and demise seem the stuff that tabloids rather than poems are made of. What Jacqueline Rose (1991: 12) has termed the out- rage of Plath prompts cultural narratives that eschew conventional...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2022) 22 (2): 325–337.
Published: 01 April 2022
... for talking's sake in the future. One girl was afraid of the mentally ill following an incident in her childhood, and volunteered to work at a care center for the mentally handicapped for a day. Another, for a similar reason, offered her services at an animal shelter. Both not only largely overcame their fears...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2015) 15 (3): 577–585.
Published: 01 October 2015
... to basics’ mentality [that] tends to set in whenever the humanities seem to be in crisis” (115).  Jay’s goal in this chapter is to diffuse, analyze, and debunk any narrow approach to the study of literature, the ill-­conceived “prescription for how to liberate literary studies from cultural studies...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2003) 3 (1): 53–72.
Published: 01 January 2003
... of these characters as though they were the right views, I acknowledged my roles as moderator and mediator. I hoped to show my students how to enter mentalities and experience points of view different from their own (Elbow 2002: 539). Students reporting on John s mentality found plenty of contraries. Some noted...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2018) 18 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 January 2018
... to describe some experiences of “invisible” disabilities, such as learning disabil- ities and mental illnesses (which can also be associated with “remedial” stu- dent populations), as a way to recast a student’s lack of preparation as a per- sonal rather than a social or institutional problem (see McRuer...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2023) 23 (1): 51–68.
Published: 01 January 2023
... hyper-ability.” To be a recognized participant is to speak with confidence and clarity. In Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability and Academic Life , Margaret Price ( 2011 ) argues that colleges’ and universities’ expectations for participation exclude disabled students who often “show up...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2002) 2 (3): 311–336.
Published: 01 October 2002
... they were exposing themselves to just to take a course heavy in critical theory and lit- erary and rhetorical analysis, they were exploring ways to re-vision the sto- ries they had been telling as fiction writers about less visible kinds of disabil- ity a mother s mental illness, a father s failing...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (2): 303–308.
Published: 01 April 2007
... is not that athletes and intellectuals simply shared the spaces in which they trained but that there were important and demanding physical elements to the rhetorical training of young orators as well as equally important mental aspects to the training of athletes. “From this spatial intermingling of practices...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2022) 22 (1): 9–15.
Published: 01 January 2022
... awareness of the struggles of those who have certain mental health conditions, and know that this study can be a good starting point in my effort to ensure equal opportunity to all who need it.” (Yasmine Mohamad, American University of Beirut) “This research matters to me because, as I go to law school...