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adult students

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Journal Article
Pedagogy (2022) 22 (1): 79–98.
Published: 01 January 2022
...Collie Fulford Abstract Adult students of diverse experiences, disciplines, and identities can become valued contributors to faculty‐directed research while also benefiting from the experience. However, national data show that older students participate in mentored research at one of the lowest...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2015) 15 (3): 535–540.
Published: 01 October 2015
...Mariette J. Bates This article explores how the experience of being a caregiver and service provider informs teaching disability studies to students who are also frontline workers in service agencies. I discuss my own history as a service provider and stepparent of an adult with disabilities who...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2018) 18 (2): 295–316.
Published: 01 April 2018
...David Aitchison This article makes a case for introducing the young archive (combining children’s and young-adult literature) into the writing classroom, primarily in the form of school story, to rouse students to rethink and, if necessary, rehabilitate expectations concerning their reading...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 567–571.
Published: 01 October 2007
... and supervises doctoral students. She worked for many years in a similar role at Anglia Ruskin University and has also taught creative writing to adult students. Her published works have been in the areas of learning and teaching (e.g., The Postgraduate Stu- dent Handbook [2001 postcolonial writing (e.g...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2012) 12 (1): 45–67.
Published: 01 January 2012
... with us because of the smaller class sizes and less expensive tuition. Two-­thirds 50  pedagogy of the students are commuters, giving the campus a predominantly regional population. In an effort to recruit location-­bound adult students, the college has been aggressively marketing its four-­year...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 501–512.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 544–555.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 534–543.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 513–525.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 526–533.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2007) 7 (3): 556–566.
Published: 01 October 2007
... was not closed until students developed independent projects in their writing, they were unable to find ways to help them do so. I argue that this dependence is, paradoxically, a direct if unintended outcome of community-based adult education and arts education, which generated a default autonomy...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2021) 21 (2): 369–383.
Published: 01 April 2021
... of adults. The revision layered upon Gina's intentions rather than shifting them to Allen's concerns. Ultimately, the interactions of these two students illustrate that the slow peer review structure can help students revise work in ways that account for the concerns of others without abandoning their own...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2017) 17 (2): 203–234.
Published: 01 April 2017
... with texts is absent from our class- rooms. Asking students to grapple intensely with a Shakespeare, a Dickinson, or a Yeats they have never felt and have no reason to believe in seems doomed to fail in the long term. We think of college as helping children become adults, but we cannot make adults...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2006) 6 (2): 337–341.
Published: 01 April 2006
... beginnings, without a road map about what the community college was to be. Many of the writers come from disci- plines other than composition: journalism, dietetics, literature, film studies. Because of the nature of community colleges — small departments, faculty wearing multiple hats, adult students...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2006) 6 (2): 342–349.
Published: 01 April 2006
.... Because of the nature of community colleges small departments, faculty wearing multiple hats, adult students with work experience interdiscipli- narity and collaboration were promoted and opportunities to connect with other fields and for instructors to learn other fields, especially emerging fields...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2006) 6 (2): 349–352.
Published: 01 April 2006
.... Because of the nature of community colleges small departments, faculty wearing multiple hats, adult students with work experience interdiscipli- narity and collaboration were promoted and opportunities to connect with other fields and for instructors to learn other fields, especially emerging fields...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2002) 2 (3): 409–412.
Published: 01 October 2002
....” In The Call to Write , ed. John Trimbur, 235 -40. New York: Longman. Parravano, Martha V. 1995 . “Deliver Us from Evie.” Review. Horn Book Magazine ,January–February, 63 -64. Rose, Alan. 1982 . “Spoken versus Written Criticism of Student Writing—Some Advantages of the Conference Method.” College...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2002) 2 (3): 413–415.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Trimbur, 235 -40. New York: Longman. Parravano, Martha V. 1995 . “Deliver Us from Evie.” Review. Horn Book Magazine ,January–February, 63 -64. Rose, Alan. 1982 . “Spoken versus Written Criticism of Student Writing—Some Advantages of the Conference Method.” College Composition and Communication...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2002) 2 (3): 416–419.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Trimbur, 235 -40. New York: Longman. Parravano, Martha V. 1995 . “Deliver Us from Evie.” Review. Horn Book Magazine ,January–February, 63 -64. Rose, Alan. 1982 . “Spoken versus Written Criticism of Student Writing—Some Advantages of the Conference Method.” College Composition and Communication...
Journal Article
Pedagogy (2002) 2 (3): 420–426.
Published: 01 October 2002
... Trimbur, 235 -40. New York: Longman. Parravano, Martha V. 1995 . “Deliver Us from Evie.” Review. Horn Book Magazine ,January–February, 63 -64. Rose, Alan. 1982 . “Spoken versus Written Criticism of Student Writing—Some Advantages of the Conference Method.” College Composition and Communication...