1-20 of 216 Search Results for

reproduce

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2014) 47 (3): 339–362.
Published: 01 November 2014
... traveler. More than rhetorically similar, both texts, I argue, dramatize epistemological crises that precipitate a renewed sense of life's contingency. Both Defoe and Hume employ Puritan spiritual autobiography, and in each case this literary mode's questionable referential status reproduces the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 116–123.
Published: 01 May 2010
..., Nancy Armstrong's hypothesis will be put to the test: the novel, she has argued, “was not made to reproduce the status quo.” © 2010 by Novel, Inc. 2010 Works Cited Anonymous . Morning Advertiser . No. 993 , 1 April 1797 . ———. New London Magazine . Vol. 4 , No. 6 (June), 1788...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2014) 47 (1): 108–131.
Published: 01 May 2014
... Peace Prize, The German Mujahid , I argue, reproduces this new iteration of Islamist totalitarianism in novel form, triangulating memory of the 1994 civil war in Algeria and memory of the Holocaust along with contemporary representations of radical Islam in Europe. Yet for a novel so concerned with...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 207–226.
Published: 01 August 2010
... health and the futures that such embodiment implies. It also warps traditional narrative attitudes toward biological futurity when the family romance no longer reproduces the heterosexual body. Barnes's novel is not a baroque anomaly among stream of consciousness narratives but perhaps the representative...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2009) 42 (2): 190–195.
Published: 01 August 2009
... exploration in media related to “The Work of Art in the Age of Its Mechanical Reproducibility.” Mid-twentieth-century arguments concerning “the death of the novel” in the West arise in relation to the diminished place of the book in the age of cinema and then later TV. Likewise, if they are to gain full...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 451–459.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Meegan Kennedy Literary critics' work on the sensation novel has often focused on these novels' purported ability to create affect—specifically suspense, shock, and fear—in their readers. This critical emphasis on how novels reproduce affect in the reader overlooks how they record affect...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2009) 42 (2): 326–331.
Published: 01 August 2009
... critics interested only in filling space, the Victorian reviewer emerges as centrally concerned with the novel as a machine for particular affects—and with how (and with what distortions) those affects, emerging over long periods of time and text, could be reproduced in miniature. © 2009 by Novel, Inc...
Image
Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 1. Melanie Klein's Berlin toys, from a set given by Klein to her housekeeper, Kathleen Cutler, and others in the possession of Klein's son, Michael Clyne. Photographed by Dr. Michael Sinason, 1988, and reproduced here with his kind permission Figure 1. Melanie Klein's Berlin toys, from a More
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2002) 36 (1): 42–60.
Published: 01 May 2002
..., in effect, it reproduces nature in spaces open, again, to development (150). In Dracula, Stoker articulates the capitalist dimensions of racialization that re- spond to this shift in the dynamics of empire. Like capitalists in Smith's modern- ized model of imperial expansion, Stoker's...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 340–342.
Published: 01 August 2010
... modernism tout court, Walkowitz singles out specific writers. She favors Joseph Conrad for his “critical dandyism: the tactical deployment of rhetoric and social detail, which allows [him] to reproduce and also to manipulate the norms of British culture” (37). In other words, just because Walko­ witz...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2012) 45 (3): 483–486.
Published: 01 November 2012
... individual dissimulation matters more than established social or economic status. Lukasik’s point is that such a mobile form of cultural distinction would have appealed to an early American readership detached from institutions (the family, church, etc.) that traditionally reproduced cultural capital...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2000) 33 (3): 407–411.
Published: 01 November 2000
... reproducing a sense of British imperial stability. Such dynamics of cultural reproduction are Levy's main concern as well. She attends especially to the tension in nineteenth-century writing between good and bad ways of reproducing people, ideas, and social rituals. Hers is a story that culminates...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2013) 46 (1): 136–139.
Published: 01 May 2013
... both conceptualize “London as the ground zero for social change on a global scale” (147). In so doing, they reproduce a familiar split between versions of cosmopolitanism: Agathocleous portrays Morris’s News from Nowhere as internationalist, while Booth’s In Darkest England revises imperialism...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2011) 44 (3): 492–495.
Published: 01 November 2011
... the modernist “highbrow” ideology that the “soli- tary” novelist and his or her writing stand apart from mass culture into a romantic sales pitch for mass-market novels. Publishers reproduced the stereotype of mass culture—the mass culture that standardizes Americans—as a “foil” or “bogeyman” (15...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2006) 39 (2): 291–294.
Published: 01 August 2006
... when the "mechanization of everyday life" took center stage in popular culture (3). Daly explains that from the Victorian era to the present, novels, movies, and plays obsessively reproduce the primal scene of technological innovation, the meeting (often violent) of human and m chine. Far from...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2011) 44 (1): 8–10.
Published: 01 May 2011
... reproducing its subjects. What is the future of the novel once the household no longer shapes the future in novels? Does the obsolescence of the traditional family mean the obsolescence of the novel as well? When broken up and dispersed, the operations of the family bear comparison to those of the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2014) 47 (3): 472–476.
Published: 01 November 2014
... recent historians’’ (95). In one eighteenth-century version of charades, partygoers would imitate various trades for their companions to guess: are you a baker? A tailor? A weaver? Successful imitations would typically hinge on reproducing a given tradesman’s characteristic deformity: his stoop, his...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 410–416.
Published: 01 November 2009
... gets reproduced. If the tale of sur- vival told by the vicar is “marginal,” it is so only from the point of view of later developments of the novel. Conversely, one should not presuppose that all the nar- ratives in the text conform to the same model of plot (they do not) or that the plot of...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2007) 40 (1-2): 77–103.
Published: 01 August 2007
..., one might say, social reproduc- tion. On the one hand, Madame Leclerc has indeed reproduced biologically in bearing a son, but her capacity to find a role for herself and for her son-to survive socially if not physically on the island-seems to stand in jeopardy of failure. Analyzing...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2015) 48 (2): 304–307.
Published: 01 August 2015
... category of useful or pragmatic learning—knowledge with a place and application in the “real world”—has served to demarcate a type of privileged knowledge that can only be reproduced in persons who are prequalified to possess it. The four chapters that follow show how works by prominent authors of the...