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reader address

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Journal Article
Novel (2019) 52 (1): 64–83.
Published: 01 May 2019
...Alicia Williams Abstract Whence the “dear reader”—and to where? This essay proposes that George Eliot's reformulation of nineteenth-century conventions for addressing reading audiences documents a response to the emergence of Britain's first mass reading public. Eliot inherits a propensity for...
Journal Article
Novel (2015) 48 (3): 446–464.
Published: 01 November 2015
... perceivable content and addresses the potential liberation of the reader from his or her world (56). The reader's ability to make judgments upon a novel are therefore similar to what Arendt describes: the suspension of the world can only happen if the reader consents willingly to the terms set forth by the...
Journal Article
Novel (2012) 45 (1): 71–93.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... Martin Eden further expresses London's belief in the capacity of literature to encourage readers to more fully inhabit their own corporeality. © 2012 by Novel, Inc. 2012 Duke University Press Teaching Old Readers New Tricks: Jack London’s Interspecies Ethics CHRISTINE...
Journal Article
Novel (2009) 42 (3): 451–459.
Published: 01 November 2009
... because Lyell’s old-earth uniformitarianism underlies the mechanism of natural selection. Although Darwin did not specifically address the place of the human within the natural world until he published Descent of Man in 1871, it was evident even to readers of Origin that natural selection had...
Journal Article
Novel (2009) 42 (3): 490–496.
Published: 01 November 2009
... very first pages of the novel, the proem in which Eliot addresses the difficulty for the nineteenth- century reader of imagining four hundred years back in time by creating a figure with precisely the opposite problem: Eliot conjures a revenant spirit, a Renaissance “Shade” who finds himself...
Journal Article
Novel (2020) 53 (1): 16–36.
Published: 01 May 2020
...-person address where Ellison's narrator imputes to his imagined reader a specific attitude toward the narrative material he has just relayed. “I can hear you say,” the Invisible Man writes, “What a horrible, irresponsible bastard!” And you're right. I leap to agree with you. I am one of the most...
Journal Article
Novel (2018) 51 (3): 375–398.
Published: 01 November 2018
...]uances [of tone and reference] obviously aren't available to a US reader,” he claims, “[b]ut I like the idea of an American reader coming upon it almost as a work in translation. Part of the appeal of such books (such as Bolaño's novels) is that they seem addressed to another audience. I don't try to...
Journal Article
Novel (2009) 42 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 May 2009
...” suggest that the supernatural is integral to realism's formal properties, thematic concerns, and critical self-reflections. Indeed, novel criticism frequently addresses readers in the idiom of the supernatural and paranormal, a language that seems particularly conducive to understanding how realist novels...
Journal Article
Novel (2012) 45 (1): 31–55.
Published: 01 May 2012
... characters—a cosmopolitan readership who are comparative in mindset and globally aware. Both realist novel and Crimean War journalism make traumatized working-class figures into symbols of a heroic nationhood, even while ultimately remaining distanced from these figures by addressing middle-class readers...
Journal Article
Novel (2014) 47 (1): 67–89.
Published: 01 May 2014
... experimentation drawn from a global cultural palette while exploring domestic or local themes. Like their Egyptian literary forerunners, these young writers addressed social and political questions, but both the urban and the geopolitical context within which they worked had altered dramatically as a result of...
Journal Article
Novel (2014) 47 (2): 187–195.
Published: 01 August 2014
... to the ‘‘explicative system Unless—to address the quandary from the other side—the condition of accom- modating Rancie`re’s work into literary studies is our refusal, or suppression, of all those moments in his work that seek to remind us that we too, as readers and scholars of literature, are...
Journal Article
Novel (2011) 44 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 May 2011
... observer like Fielding’s narrator to distance Arabella; she is merely described” (277). This is an uncharac- teristic statement for a usually perceptive critic. It is safe to say most readers would agree that The Female Quixote addresses the question of the difference between fiction...
Journal Article
Novel (2016) 49 (3): 486–503.
Published: 01 November 2016
... Monsieur Dessein's coach yard, writing the preface for a journey that has hardly commenced (11). Using the conventional device of a preface, Yorick addresses his readers in an attempt to interest them in his journey, which he asserts “will be altogether of a different cast from any of my fore-runners” (13...
Journal Article
Novel (2012) 45 (1): 6–9.
Published: 01 May 2012
... also some of the most central aspects of our relationship with narratives whose outcomes we care intensely about even though our caring cannot affect those outcomes. Fictional characters are especially immune to the exercise of a reader's or audience's will, so Newcomb's problem is particularly...
Journal Article
Novel (2015) 48 (2): 190–207.
Published: 01 August 2015
... (383–85). Fonty's cultural heritage is as pan-European as the wide audience the novel addresses. Even while the reader is coming to terms with Fonty (born in 1919) as Don Quixote, he or she has to grasp his relationship to Theodor Fontane (1819–98), from whom he derives his nickname. Both the...
Journal Article
Novel (2020) 53 (1): 57–75.
Published: 01 May 2020
... between the subject and the world, this experiential truth has to be translated by the “knowledgeable” narrator. Addressing this exchange of knowledge from character to narrator to reader, Dorrit Cohn describes What Maisie Knew as a novel in which James exploits the advantages of psycho-narration...
Journal Article
Novel (2012) 45 (3): 327–342.
Published: 01 November 2012
... constitutes, legitimates, and sometimes alters the institutional conditions that regulated disparate aspects of the social order. Because of their capacity to take hold of the processes of behaving, thinking, and feeling immanent to their readers' conduct and to create affective protocols that introduce and...
Journal Article
Novel (2020) 53 (3): 317–340.
Published: 01 November 2020
... in her attempts to find out the key to Lucy's hidden nature: “But are you anybody? . . . Do— do tell me who you are? I'll not repeat it” (309). Lucy's outward response is again to laugh and dismiss Ginevra. However, she gives a lengthier narrative to the reader. In a direct address, she tells how...
Journal Article
Novel (2009) 42 (3): 387–392.
Published: 01 November 2009
... consequence of investing it with a libidinal charge. Lethem's novel Motherless Brooklyn (1999) offers a case study in which the narrator Lionel's Tourettic tics gain significance not for some psycho-biographical cause they reveal but for their effects, on the reader as much as on the world of the text itself...
Journal Article
Novel (2009) 42 (2): 239–244.
Published: 01 August 2009
... Quixote's illusions are shattered but because they are realized and relayed to other readers who read them, and perhaps misread them, in turn. History is represented not when the ideals of romance are swept away but when the procedures of romance are self-consciously adapted and adopted, for play, for...