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Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 1. “An account of the many fine seats of noblemen,” 1763 ( Parnell ). By permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library Figure 1. “An account of the many fine seats of noblemen,” 1763 (Parnell). By permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library More
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 393–399.
Published: 01 November 2009
... photography. I argue that many novelists need the idea of photography as freezing a moment in time to meet their own narrative ends, to signify an instant of stopped action: that way, too, they retain authorial control of the (imaginary) photograph's signification. Their version of photography is underwritten...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 517–523.
Published: 01 November 2009
... lie latent in the length itself of the triple-decker novel? A reading of Bleak House suggests that its expansive form specifically allowed Dickens to represent multiple social, economic, and institutional networks. Linking the many characters in Bleak House is a dense overlapping of networked...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 207–226.
Published: 01 August 2010
... imagined around figures such as Dr. O'Connor whose desire, as he says, to “boil some good man's potatoes and toss up a child … every nine months” reinforces his queer identity and annexes the importance of disability in many of the novel's characters. Modernist cultural representations of the pregnant male...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 294–319.
Published: 01 August 2010
... in Harlem and instigator of a major crusade against comic books throughout the 1950s. Ellison's published writings and those stored at the Library of Congress make apparent that issues surrounding the comic book culture of the Cold War directly link up with many of Invisible Man 's bigger themes: the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2012) 45 (1): 27–29.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Barbara Herrnstein Smith The forum's question might be interpreted more broadly and evoke a broader set of answers than found in these essays. For example, we might recall that, for many people over much of recorded history, the texts that have been the central objects of reading activities have...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2011) 44 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 May 2011
... contemporary world. By reading the movement to the novel as one into desire (instead of away from it, as many critics have claimed), I suggest that Lennox reverses the terms of her contemporary critical discourse on realistic and fantastic fiction; the author uses the romance, not the novel, to teach her...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2013) 46 (3): 364–385.
Published: 01 November 2013
... contingency that many readers of Hopkins's text have noted in fact constitute a response to James's theories—a statement recognizing the unfinished quality of diasporic black political action. © 2013 by Novel, Inc. 2013 Duke University Press Transnational Healing in Pauline Hopkins’s Of One...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2013) 46 (3): 406–423.
Published: 01 November 2013
... remains understudied. I turn to Wright's Depression-era story, originally published in Uncle Tom's Children: Four Novellas , because he explores a similar question regarding the 1927 Mississippi Flood, which many consider the precursor to Hurricane Katrina. Wright's story not only clues readers in to the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2013) 46 (3): 424–437.
Published: 01 November 2013
... Bloch's term) at odds with the rhetorical forms of joking that are more usually associated with anticipation and futurity. The anteriority of the novel's joking is a reminder of the cultural memory in which Dublin is steeped; historical grievances, which in many ways determine each character's private...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2019) 52 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 May 2019
... many kinds—the bildungsroman, the regional novel, crime fiction, the roman à clef, the biblical allegory. Transplanting conventions from these various genres into narrative contexts where they seem not to belong, Condition of England novels exploit generic dissonance as an instrument of open-ended...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 366–372.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Jed Esty Lukácsian narrative theory remains influential in literary studies despite the fact that many of its principles and conclusions seem specific to novel production within the industrializing heartland of the nineteenth-century European nation-state. Starting with the premise that two of...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 18–22.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Lorri Nandrea Psychoanalytic paradigms have been widely and successfully used to understand the relationships between desire and narrative fiction. The fact that Freud's theory accounts so well for the structure of many novels, particularly nineteenth-century novels, may lead critics to overlook...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2009) 42 (2): 284–289.
Published: 01 August 2009
...Amanda Claybaugh It is a surprising fact of literary history that many of the most important nineteenth-century authors served, at some point in their careers, as US consul. The list of these authors includes James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, James Russell Lowell, William Dean Howells...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 53–59.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Kathy Alexis Psomiades Both the novel and anthropology think about and through marriage and kinship. Furthermore, many of us use theories that ultimately originate in anthropology to think about how marriage and kinship work in the novel. This essay argues that the historical emergence of...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2009) 42 (2): 297–303.
Published: 01 August 2009
...William A. Cohen Among the many elements that divert the nineteenth-century novel's plot and characters from achieving their ends—and thus keep such narratives moving—envy occupies a special place. Envy is so psychologically powerful that it often threatens not only to irretrievably derail the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 78–82.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Bruce Robbins “Too Much Information” takes issue with critic James Wood's charge that “information” plays a disproportionate and aesthetically unfortunate role in many of the larger and more ambitious novels recently published in English. It makes a case for the value of information. It does so...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 93–99.
Published: 01 May 2010
... nothing more than an efficacious fiction used to mask a state of perpetual war, one in which civilians are the primary targets and anything that can be seen can be destroyed. (The latter attitude, curiously, is held both by military elites and by many of their critics in war and conflict studies.) In...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 140–147.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Charlotte Sussman This essay argues that the problem of witnessing in the Romantic-era novel is caught up with the problem of moral epistemology and that both are inflected by temporality. Focusing on Charles Maturin's 1820 gothic Melmoth the Wanderer , this essay argues that, like many of the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 169–175.
Published: 01 May 2010
... can openly address anyone, at periodic intervals, with dispatch and presumptive privacy. This new technology for ordinary communication at a distance influenced the novel in many ways. Novels were cast in the form of correspondence by letter; the post facilitated the dissemination of physical novels...