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Published: 01 May 2017
Figure 1. “An account of the many fine seats of noblemen,” 1763 ( Parnell ). By permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library Figure 1. “An account of the many fine seats of noblemen,” 1763 (Parnell). By permission of the Folger Shakespeare Library More
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 517–523.
Published: 01 November 2009
... lie latent in the length itself of the triple-decker novel? A reading of Bleak House suggests that its expansive form specifically allowed Dickens to represent multiple social, economic, and institutional networks. Linking the many characters in Bleak House is a dense overlapping of networked...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 393–399.
Published: 01 November 2009
... photography. I argue that many novelists need the idea of photography as freezing a moment in time to meet their own narrative ends, to signify an instant of stopped action: that way, too, they retain authorial control of the (imaginary) photograph's signification. Their version of photography is underwritten...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 140–147.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Charlotte Sussman This essay argues that the problem of witnessing in the Romantic-era novel is caught up with the problem of moral epistemology and that both are inflected by temporality. Focusing on Charles Maturin's 1820 gothic Melmoth the Wanderer , this essay argues that, like many of the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 169–175.
Published: 01 May 2010
... can openly address anyone, at periodic intervals, with dispatch and presumptive privacy. This new technology for ordinary communication at a distance influenced the novel in many ways. Novels were cast in the form of correspondence by letter; the post facilitated the dissemination of physical novels...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 189–196.
Published: 01 May 2010
... Rushdie and many of his defenders characterized as the result of a failure to attend to the fictiveness of fiction. The essay points out, in the context of this controversy, the temptation to assert a categorical distinction between fictive and nonfictive discourses—and the limitations of any such...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2014) 47 (2): 187–195.
Published: 01 August 2014
... Literature ), his work on pedagogy and aesthetics, and the literature of novel theory in the twentieth century, including the work of Georg Lukács and Mikhail Bakhtin. Rancière's insistence upon the “democratic” quality of the novel form presents a quandary for many readers, due to his reluctance to speak in...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2012) 45 (2): 257–275.
Published: 01 August 2012
... configuration in which many groups might be said to intersect but cannot be said to cohere. © 2012 by Novel, Inc. 2012 Duke University Press Works Cited Anderson Benedict . Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism . London : Verso , 1991 . Appadurai Arjun...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2013) 46 (3): 364–385.
Published: 01 November 2013
... contingency that many readers of Hopkins's text have noted in fact constitute a response to James's theories—a statement recognizing the unfinished quality of diasporic black political action. © 2013 by Novel, Inc. 2013 Duke University Press Works Cited Bordogna Francesca . “Inner Division and...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2014) 47 (1): 149–166.
Published: 01 May 2014
... both to legitimize “the People” of democracy and to manage the inherent instability in that category, and dominant theoretical models for explaining literature's democratic potential have also relied on and naturalized those mechanisms. Yet Krik? Krak! indexes the many exclusions smuggled in through...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 207–226.
Published: 01 August 2010
... imagined around figures such as Dr. O'Connor whose desire, as he says, to “boil some good man's potatoes and toss up a child … every nine months” reinforces his queer identity and annexes the importance of disability in many of the novel's characters. Modernist cultural representations of the pregnant male...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 294–319.
Published: 01 August 2010
... in Harlem and instigator of a major crusade against comic books throughout the 1950s. Ellison's published writings and those stored at the Library of Congress make apparent that issues surrounding the comic book culture of the Cold War directly link up with many of Invisible Man 's bigger themes: the...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2012) 45 (1): 27–29.
Published: 01 May 2012
...Barbara Herrnstein Smith The forum's question might be interpreted more broadly and evoke a broader set of answers than found in these essays. For example, we might recall that, for many people over much of recorded history, the texts that have been the central objects of reading activities have...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2011) 44 (1): 31–46.
Published: 01 May 2011
... contemporary world. By reading the movement to the novel as one into desire (instead of away from it, as many critics have claimed), I suggest that Lennox reverses the terms of her contemporary critical discourse on realistic and fantastic fiction; the author uses the romance, not the novel, to teach her...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2015) 48 (1): 18–44.
Published: 01 May 2015
... that others are with us, narrating and experiencing our lives alongside us, even when we are alone. Analyzing Tess alongside Winnicott's relational solitude reframes many of the perceived failures of the novel—its stylistic incongruities and particularly the often-criticized “uneven” characterization...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2015) 48 (1): 45–62.
Published: 01 May 2015
...Matthew Sussman For many readers, “stupidity” in Henry James signifies mental slowness, poor taste, or even moral delinquency. However, James also conceived of stupidity as a positive virtue because it promises to deliver the individual from the “ordeal of consciousness” associated with...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2015) 48 (3): 421–445.
Published: 01 November 2015
... attempts to answer the seemingly mundane questions of why the monster talks about food at moments of high drama or why the novel is littered with so many “disembodied eyes,” to borrow Jay Clayton's phrase. In part, I argue the creature's development is a kind of art appreciation class where he learns to...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2017) 50 (3): 351–359.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Timothy Bewes Just when the political stakes of truth and falsity in the United States seem to be higher than ever, many American writers are exploring a conceptual space located “on the very edge of fiction,” as one author puts it. Are such strategies still readable in ideological terms, or are...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2009) 42 (3): 366–372.
Published: 01 November 2009
...Jed Esty Lukácsian narrative theory remains influential in literary studies despite the fact that many of its principles and conclusions seem specific to novel production within the industrializing heartland of the nineteenth-century European nation-state. Starting with the premise that two of...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 18–22.
Published: 01 May 2010
...Lorri Nandrea Psychoanalytic paradigms have been widely and successfully used to understand the relationships between desire and narrative fiction. The fact that Freud's theory accounts so well for the structure of many novels, particularly nineteenth-century novels, may lead critics to overlook...