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exhibition

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Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2011) 44 (3): 424–443.
Published: 01 November 2011
... exhibitions, two of modernism's best-known ironists, Joseph Conrad and E. M. Forster, discovered that attending to the gaze these visual contact zones solicit—a detached scientific gaze that does not empathize with who or what one looks upon but instead encourages exhibition visitors to imagine themselves as...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 83–92.
Published: 01 May 2010
... distribution regimes, and the careers of dramatizers, directors, and stars. Focusing on the early twenty-first century adaptations of Jane Austen's novels, I argue here that the differing ways print and filmic media are packaged, advertised, and sold or exhibited to potential cultural consumers creates and...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2014) 47 (3): 339–362.
Published: 01 November 2014
... epistemological uncertainty that each text represents. Crusoe and Hume model how such epistemological uncertainty might be a source of pleasing wonder by exhibiting an attitude of viewing the ordinary as if it were rare, and the illusory as if it were real—and by extension the real as if it were illusory. The...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2014) 47 (3): 403–421.
Published: 01 November 2014
... Ware 's ambiguities. Insofar as the accusation of cynicism implicitly calls into question motivations (those of both characters and novelists), the very structure of that accusation itself exhibits a kind of cynicism. Rather than a theme to be located or an attitude to be diagnosed, the appearance of...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2015) 48 (2): 208–223.
Published: 01 August 2015
...Timothy Wientzen Exhibiting formal characteristics of works published decades later, Knut Hamsun's Hunger (1890) has long occupied a central position in genealogies of modernism. Its status in the modernist canon, however, has often come at the cost of disregarding the cultural and economic...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2017) 50 (2): 295–298.
Published: 01 August 2017
... multiplication of names for, the many things that must be included (museums, galleries, exhibitions; the mixed, the polyglot, the multifarious, the crowded; confusion, bewilderment, jumble) resulting in sentences so full of parenthetical reminders, qualifications, and redundancies that they create their own...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2008) 41 (2-3): 371–373.
Published: 01 November 2008
..., exhibitions, totality, and ultimately, empire. Deriving his theoretical coordinates from Stallybrass and White, Bataille, and de Certeau, among others, Koenigsberger offers detailed readings of a select tradition of the British novel from Dickens to Rushdie, in- cluding, among others, Hard Titnes...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2013) 46 (1): 136–139.
Published: 01 May 2013
... seems most closely associated with modernity, sometimes with empire, sometimes with humanity. “These often conflicting affiliations and meanings were hard to disentangle,” Agathocleous observes, in such instances as the Great Exhibition of 1851, at which “cosmo- politanism-as-globalization was...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2005) 39 (1): 146–149.
Published: 01 May 2005
... benefit. Pettitt is an expert guide to the development and deployment of the intersecting "model[s] of disenfranchised creativity" (45) in the period. Pettitt's next chapter looks at the relationship between authorshp and invention at, and in the shadow of, the Great Exhibition of 1851. Much...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 72–77.
Published: 01 May 2010
...' Letters.” Household Words 30 Mar. 1850 : 19 –24. Dickens , Charles , and Horne Richard. “The Great Exhibition and the Little One.” Household Words 5 July 1851 : 356 –60. Miller , Andrew . Novels behind Glass: Commodity Culture and Victorian Narrative . New York: Cambridge...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2006) 39 (3): 421–424.
Published: 01 November 2006
... midcentury marked by the Great Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations, the social world of Great Britain had yet to become the society of the spectacle. As Freedgood ex- plains, "'industry' was still largely human practice, including machine and factory as well as hand and home production" (147...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2010) 43 (2): 354–356.
Published: 01 August 2010
... compendium of pet names and epi­ thets” (153), but his own work is itself something of a “manic compendium”: the chapter on What Maisie Knew includes discussions of race, money, ghosts, empire, education, and exhibition, as well as an illuminating account of the popular late-eighteenth-century visual...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2018) 51 (2): 362–373.
Published: 01 August 2018
... “American Way of Life.” 1 This scene fictionalizes the historic exchange between Moscow and Washington in 1959 (the year W. E. B. Du Bois was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize), when each regime set up exhibitions extolling the virtues of capitalism or communism, respectively, and sent delegations to their...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2007) 40 (3): 303–304.
Published: 01 November 2007
... devoted, Never Let Me Go: that story of a race of clones cared for, fed and cultivated to be organ donors. I can't help but think of the narrator of this novel, who exhibits no emphatic anger or even disappointment, really--only grief made quiet by a discipline assumed and instilled, as a more...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2001) 34 (3): 369–390.
Published: 01 November 2001
... not in the schoolroom but in a range of urban sites of entertainment and leisure. With her various guardians, and particularly with Sir Claude, who is referred to as "showman of the specta- cle" (Maisie 121), Maisie visits shops, parks, museums, cafes, exhibition grounds, and hotels, and...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2011) 44 (3): 471–475.
Published: 01 November 2011
... that white British women sentimental writers channeled their anger or utopian visions through their writing about Native Americans; chapter 5 focuses on epic representations of Native Americans in both the Great Exhibition of London in 1851 and stories of Hiawatha, including an Ojibwa performance...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2011) 44 (2): 320–323.
Published: 01 August 2011
... takes us beyond Agamben’s account of that relationship, in which the sovereign and homo sacer are “correlative” or “symmetrical” to or with each other. Elmer argues that new world writing on the racialized sovereign “exhibits the short circuit between” the sovereign and homo sacer...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2011) 44 (1): 156–158.
Published: 01 May 2011
...- bridge UP, 2008), pp. 250, cloth, $93.00. In February 2010 a small exhibit of Victorian photocollages, Playing with Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage, opened at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art. A review by Roberta Smith in the New York Times a few days later expressed surprise at...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2007) 40 (3): 207–215.
Published: 01 November 2007
... reproducible medium of cinema. Ishiguro's screenplays, including The White Countess, exhibit a curious inau- thenticity. Characters, events, settings and themes appear as if dislodged from novels already written. Novelists doubling as screenplay-writers are certainly not uncommon; however, as a...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2000) 33 (2): 253–255.
Published: 01 August 2000
... how Mary Lincoln sold her costly dresses to pay off debts. Keckley orchestrates this narrative to put Mrs. Lincoln in the ironic position of being a body exposed (at least symbolically through the exhibition of her clothes), which Merish compellingly links to the humiliating display of black...