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Jeremy Bentham

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Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2017) 50 (2): 236–254.
Published: 01 August 2017
... readers. Even as Phineas Finn speaks the idiom of John Stuart Mill's liberal orientation toward feelings and beliefs, the novel's distribution of narrative focalization provides an alternative pedagogy in Jeremy Bentham's utilitarian orientation toward action. Reading the novel's form against its content...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2015) 48 (2): 289–291.
Published: 01 August 2015
... its way into, alongside, “with” others. Although Greiner's principal focus is on the novel form, chapter 2, “The Art of Knowing Your Own Nothingness: Bentham, Austen, and the Realist Case,” begins by considering the role of sympathy in Jeremy Bentham's theory of fictions and R. G. Collingwood's...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2001) 35 (1): 24–45.
Published: 01 May 2001
... . Imagining the Penitentiary . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1987 . Bentham , Jeremy . “Panopticon versus New South Wales.” 1802. The Works of Jeremy Bentham . Vol. 4 . Bristol: Thoemmes P, 1995 . 173 –248. Bentham , Jeremy . “A Plea for the Constitution.” 1803. The Works of Jeremy Bentham...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2013) 46 (3): 460–463.
Published: 01 November 2013
... narrative technique of free indirect discourse “correlates” with the penitentiary prison envisioned by Jeremy Bentham’s Panopticon (157). In William Godwin’s Caleb Williams, Bender posits a fascinating development whereby the “utopian anarchist” author, by virtue of his commit- ment to this narrative...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2010) 43 (1): 38–46.
Published: 01 May 2010
... correspondence exactly contemporary with the composition and publication of “What Is Poetry?” Raised under the austere radicalism of Jeremy Bentham, with its stripped-down Associationist psychology, Mill was initially overwhelmed by Carlyle’s appeals for his friendship. But the correspondence reveals...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2001) 34 (2): 267–292.
Published: 01 August 2001
...MARILYN BUTLER Copyright © Novel Corp. 2001 2001 Works Cited Beaufort, Frances. Letter to William Beaufort. 2 July 1797. Ms. 13176. Edgeworth Letters, to 1817. National Library of Ireland, Dublin. Bentham , Jeremy . “A Pupil of Miss Edgeworth’s.” Examiner 20 February 1814: 124–26...
Journal Article
Novel (1 November 2000) 33 (3): 307–327.
Published: 01 November 2000
....” PMLA 77 ( 1962 ): 268 –79. Mill , John Stuart , and Jeremy Bentham. Utilitarianism and Other Essays . Ed. Alan Ryan. New York: Penguin, 1987 . Nunokawa , Jeff . “The Miser’s Two Bodies: Silas Marner and the Sexual Possibilities of the Commodity.” Victorian Studies 36 ( 1993...
Journal Article
Novel (1 August 2018) 51 (2): 188–209.
Published: 01 August 2018
... theory of capital and morality equitably traversing the whole of human society, from pauper to nobleman. Jeremy Bentham calls pleasure and pain the two masters of the human condition upon which all sociopolitical life is constructed as a secondary operation. In making this claim, he forges a link...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2011) 44 (1): 47–66.
Published: 01 May 2011
... an undetectable punitive force (355). According to D. A. Miller, Bucket and his “unlimited number of eyes” seem to incarnate Jeremy Bentham’s (or Michel Foucault’s) Panopticon, “the instrument of permanent, exhaustive, omnipresent surveillance, capable of making all visible, as long as it...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2014) 47 (1): 24–42.
Published: 01 May 2014
... scaffold. Foucault quickly moves from that grisly spec- tacle to the very different stage props afforded by Jeremy Bentham’s architectural design for a new kind of penal institution—the prototype, in Foucault’s analysis, for all modern social institutions that work on the body through the individual’s...
Journal Article
Novel (1 May 2015) 48 (1): 18–44.
Published: 01 May 2015
... “multiple levels of existence, a surface and recesses, an exterior and an interior” but rather what Gallagher calls nonbeings or, after Jeremy Bentham, “imaginary nonentities.” Their lack of existence and our consequent ability to see inside them is the source of their affective appeal (356–57). Readers...