In spite of Jonathan Sterne's optimistic anointing of the “sound student” in his introduction to The Sound Studies Reader (2012), the rendezvous of modernist sound studies and literary studies has been a dawdling affair. Individual monographs have made strides into this inter-discipline—for one, Angela Frattarola's Modernist Soundscapes (2018)—and impressive collections such as Sounding Modernism (2017) promise good things to come, but it remains a theoretical mélange, with as many methods as committed scholars, and what methods have emerged are often outsourced to apparent critical intermediaries such as musicology, the history of technology, and, most often, media studies. Discussions of literary sound largely have continued to labor with borrowed tools, notably with the lexicon of what Jay Martin calls “ocularcentrism,” which is perhaps most apparent in close-reading strategies that gravitate toward intensive, momentary observations of a perspicacious narrator. Whereas the eye accrues knowledge of a subject's immediate surroundings (and its literary...

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