Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights is deeply entangled in the reproduction of imperialist sentiment, including notions of racial otherness and white (English) supremacy, as has long been established by a range of scholars.1 Indeed, the rise of fields such as critical race studies and postcolonial studies has been accompanied by a mounting awareness of the extent to which not only Brontë and her sisters2 but in fact a wide range of Victorian novelists were shaped by colonial discourse, and how they contributed to empire being “processed and naturalized” in nineteenth-century Britain (Perera 7).3 References to empire and plantation economies, however marginal, frequently enable nineteenth-century novelists to install powerful game changers in their plots: white protagonists in distress turn to empire and find affordable routes to financial wealth, happiness, independence, individuality, and/or subjecthood. They encounter manifold “realms of possibility” (Said 75) and reap “just rewards”...

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