Readers of an American literary journal like Novel might be forgiven for wondering why Sarah Brouillette would devote several years of study to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. Can one seriously expect to discover “the fate of the literary” lurking in the reports, proceedings, and verbose declarations of UNESCO? Cultural policy studies has been a dynamic field of interdisciplinary research and theory for more than three decades now. But its leading figures have been in Australia and, to a lesser extent, Europe and the United Kingdom, while scholars in North America have remained on the sidelines. This is especially true among literary scholars, of whom even the more sociologically inclined have shown little interest in exploring the role that institutions and agencies of cultural policy might play in the production of literary values, hierarchies, and dispositions or in the ways...

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