Aarthi Vadde's Chimeras of Form: Modernist Internationalism beyond Europe, 1914–2016 grafts its signature terms together to reconsider the phenomenon known as high modernism, deftly anatomized through a reading of James Joyce, as part and parcel of an always already anticolonial, globally connected, and formally heterogeneous mode. Modernism's long reach encompasses Rabindranath Tagore's early twentieth-century auto-translated poetry and prose, Claude McKay and George Lamming's national-diasporic novels of black America and black Britain, Michael Ondaatje's Sri Lankan and North American landscapes of history, myth, memory, and legend, and Zadie Smith's multiracial postcolonial London. The chimera, a category whose hybrid coupling allows it to “at once delimit the possible and exceed it” (2), serves as a cipher for what Vadde takes as modernism's signature blending of politics and aesthetics. Each of the writers examined, though separated by period and geography, is shown to draw from a...

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