In keeping with the title of Alix Beeston's ambitious book on modernist writing and photography, In and Out of Sight weaves a complex argument concerning what the author calls “the gendered and racialized logics of inclusion and exclusion that continue to define the limits of modernist literature” (5). The book's aim, in this sense, is to open up the visual aspects of modernism in order to reframe how those traditionally othered by modernist practice can be relocated and, in a sense, re-seen. Not unlike Stuart Burrows's A Familiar Strangeness: American Fiction and the Language of Photography, 1839–1945, it deliberately sets out to work as a malleable examination into how the visual, as filtered through photography in particular, operates within certain canonical modernist texts. As in Burrows's case, rather than reiterate the by now fairly well-trodden argument that modernism's adoption of the camera...

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