At the time when new readings of modernism are emerging, from global to queer to posthuman, Steve Pinkerton in Blasphemous Modernism proposes a revision through the lenses of religion. In so doing, he contributes to the current “religious turn” in literary studies, spearheaded by scholars such as Pericles Lewis, Stanley Fish, and J. Hillis Miller. In their wake, Pinkerton affirms the persistence of religion in both the culture and the art of the supposedly disenchanted twentieth century. The book studies three writers—James Joyce, Mina Loy, and Djuna Barnes—as well as an entire movement, “the Niggeratti” in 1920s and 1930s Harlem, and offers a coda on Salman Rushdie to show how invested in religion modernism is and how the twentieth and twenty-first centuries continue “to seek in scriptures and theology the particular sources of meaning, affect, and literary force that only religion seemed...

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