Daniel M. Stout's Corporate Romanticism: Liberalism, Justice, and the Novel is concerned—rightly and presciently so—with the inherent multiplicity of individual action, that which lies at the very foundation of liberal thought. He shows that neither the individual nor the action is ever singular, or—more precisely—that this singularity is always already (or paradoxically, depending on what school of thought you belong to) corporate. Most important, he shows not only that this paradox harks back to the Romantic period and the cradle of liberal thought but that it was acknowledged, discussed, and the cause of much philosophical concern at the time. “These confusions of personhood and action are not exceptions to the law of liberal individualism; they are the confusions that are its only history” (6).

While well-versed in Romantic and liberal political theory, Stout chooses to project these concerns onto an analysis of...

You do not currently have access to this content.