Since the publication of Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic, only a few books have had a really significant impact on the field of African American studies. These include Brent Edwards's The Practice of Diaspora, Kenneth Warren's What Was African American Literature?, and Hazel Carby's Race Men. If Emily Lordi's Black Resonance receives its due, it will be recognized as having made a similarly significant contribution to the field. In particular, Black Resonance does for the study of African American literature, African American music, and black feminist theory what Edwards's book did for the study of the circum-Atlantic black world: by way of careful and intimate engagement with her intellectual predecessors, including African American women vocal artists, Lordi carries black feminist thought into new and fecund territory. Lordi's detailed analysis of literature, music, and the relation of black writers...

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