Romance appears to be one of those genres that never lacks for readers but that always needs friends. This contradiction propels Emily S. Davis's insightful and thought-provoking Rethinking the Romance Genre, which examines how and why the romance (and its shadow, the gothic) has been useful for postcolonial and diasporic literary and visual culture in the contemporary period. In this book on late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century romance, Davis takes up some of the most intriguing questions about desire and politics in the age of globalization. Building upon new theories of intimacy, Rethinking the Romance Genre advocates a view of romance that is entangled in thorny questions of history, economics, race, and empire.

Why is it that contemporary political romances are often read as too political to be properly romantic or too romantic to be properly political? This is the energizing...

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