In approaching Rewiring the Real, I find myself unusually sensitive to a number of very different contexts within which I might provide a critical reading of the book. The consequent self-consciousness and discursive uncertainty are prompted by the book itself. The address of Mark C. Taylor's essay is unclear. Is it, chiefly, literary criticism? secular theology? philosophy? a critical history of communication technologies? a manifesto of artistic practice? For the immediately present context—here in Novel—I am concerned to address Taylor's book as his reading of four important prose works by four important, well-established writers. Rewiring the Real does, clearly, support my concern. Four of five more or less equally substantial chapters are devoted to four novels: Gaddis's The Recognitions, Powers's Ploughing the Dark, Danielewski's House of Leaves, and DeLillo's Underworld. But I am given to understand,...

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