Lawrence Phillips's The South Pacific Narratives of Robert Louis Stevenson and Jack London makes a timely contribution to the ongoing interrogation of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Western writing in and about the Pacific, a project that first came to prominence in the late 1990s under the aegis of postcolonial studies through the work of Rod Edmond and Vanessa Smith in particular. Along with Herman Melville, Stevenson and London form a kind of holy trinity of prominent writers who made it to the region: Stevenson spent the final years of his life in the Pacific, from his relocation to Samoa in 1888 until his death in 1894, while London spent several years there during the next decade. Of their resultant writings, critical attention has largely focused on Stevenson, especially the short stories published in Island Nights' Entertainments (1893) and his novella The...

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