Elizabeth Carolyn Miller's monograph treats late Victorian literary radicalism, a relatively neglected area, with an inventive paradigm of anticapitalist or “slow” print culture. Viewing literature as not autonomous but constrained by the power of print culture has been a critical procedure for some time now, at least since Marshall McLuhan, Raymond Williams, and Walter Ong. The History of the Book scholarship as well as Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities (1983) have made “print culture” a rich area of study. Miller is working within this disciplinary field, and her own approach yields interesting results. Other welcome features of her study are the inclusion of the radical periodical, small press, and private theater as types of print culture worthy of close attention; also welcome is her rather catholic sense of what is meant by “radical,” which entails middle and working class as well as Fabians,...

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