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negro

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Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2018) 2018 (42-43): 124–135.
Published: 01 November 2018
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2011) 2011 (29): 78–85.
Published: 01 November 2011
...Jeanne Siegel Spiral, founded in 1963 by Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, and Charles Alston, was a group of black American artists in New York. This article, originally published in ARTnews in 1966, explores the attitudes of Spiral’s membership about civil rights, Negro art, the “Negro Image,” and...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2011) 2011 (29): 140–151.
Published: 01 November 2011
... the two major movements in African American art of the twentieth century—the New Negro Arts movement and the Black Arts movement—Jones’s unique black perspective was often viewed through the mask, a symbol of classical African art and a signifier of black identity. For her, it acted as muse for a...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2017) 2017 (41): 14–29.
Published: 01 November 2017
...Mia L. Bagneris Unequivocal in his professed lack of interest in incorporating any sort of African influence into his work, Palmer Hayden once famously quipped: “I never had any desire to paint anything about Africa. I painted what Negroes, colored people, us Americans do … we’re a brand new race...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2018) 2018 (42-43): 136–153.
Published: 01 November 2018
... of Negro Arts (Dakar, Senegal, 1966), the International Meeting of Sculptors (Mexico City, 1968), and the Pan-African Cultural Festival (Algiers, 1969). The transnational relationships and growing solidarity with Third Worldism and Pan-Africanism evident in the exhibition history of the 1960s show...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2011) 2011 (29): 8–21.
Published: 01 November 2011
... between the invested in a similar collection process and also in lines. The 1968 Third World Press broadside of Don black collection of blackness, as opposed to what Lee’s poem “for black people (and negroes too): a the movement saw as the dominant (white) culture’s poetic statement on black...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 1999) 1999 (10): 72.
Published: 01 May 1999
... a large open-mouthed negro gap• Charles: An American Artist, 1989- ing to receive cunnilingus or per• 1997" shown last year...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2006) 2006 (20): 96–115.
Published: 01 May 2006
..., _ Journal of Contemporary African Art cials and fines for their communities. contemporary cultural discourses that articulated The second show, called Struggle for Negro Rights, lynching's social impact in relation to concepts of was developed by leftist members of the Artists...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2008) 2008 (22-23): 206–207.
Published: 01 May 2008
... part of the Harlem Renais• relief against the transformations it introducing this statements with refer• sance and New Negro discourse in the undergoes in our inevitably social ence to their author's name, journal, 1920s have resulted in a...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2007) 2007 (21): 34–46.
Published: 01 May 2007
... tion, and stereotype and anticipated black (domestic work).3 Maudelle conformed to none women's self-portraiture of the late twentieth cen• of these. Though there were movements by artists tury. Emerging out of both the New Negro period from the Harlem Renaissance through...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2012) 2012 (30): 76–83.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... We would be T wealthier Chicago suburb one hot July day freed. in 1962, I asked Wadsworth Jarrell if he thought it But this was before the Washington picnic, its would be possible to start a “negro” art movement eloquent dream and its dynamite reality at the based on a common aesthetic...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2013) 2013 (32): 36–49.
Published: 01 May 2013
... through music. In “Singing Saints,” Sargent Johnson has litho- Dorothy C. (1939) is an interpretation of a modern graphed a true lyrical feeling of the full tones of the black woman, but it shares its compositional organi- Negro voices and accomplished it with a simple sin- zation and urban context...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2015) 2015 (37): 38–43.
Published: 01 November 2015
... photographs daguerreotype, the first successful photographic would also fulfill a pornographic function under the process, to an enthusiastic crowd of its membership. guise of science. In the 1850s, in a speech titled “The Negro as Man,” The same illogic also informed a social order in Douglass spoke...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2011) 2011 (29): 86–99.
Published: 01 November 2011
...- nized by Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, and ington and we thought it might be interesting as a I Charles Alston in 1963, is the model for postwar group of Negro artists maybe to hire a bus — a great American artist groups.1 Under the banner of civil number of people, as you know, were converging on...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2017) 2017 (41): 154–164.
Published: 01 November 2017
..., 2000). 2 See, for example, Holland Cotter, “Art View: Art That’s Valued for What It Can Do,” New York Times, July 18, 1993. 3 Alain Locke, “The Legacy of Ancestral Arts,” in The New Negro: An Interpretation, ed. Alain Locke (New York: Boni, 1925), 254–67. 4 See Paul Guillaume, “The...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2016) 2016 (38-39): 14–21.
Published: 01 November 2016
... silver print, 40 x 39.9 cm. Courtesy Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany adoration, the idolization of the Negro.”3 Charlotte March’s Donyale Luna takes this pronouncement...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2011) 2011 (29): 22–31.
Published: 01 November 2011
... but at the negroes rebellion and revolution, I suppose the most politi- who accepted it. cally sensitive of us began to pull away from the That’s why the Cuban Revolution was so heavy bourgeois rubric that art and politics were separate in our sensibility. That’s why Robert Williams was and...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 1995) 1995 (2): 62–66.
Published: 01 May 1995
... the pressure to produce "negro" art: the familiar pantheon of the New York School, there might have been two For about the last eight years, I have been concerned not only with my responses: one blank and bemused: own creative...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 November 2015) 2015 (37): 104–113.
Published: 01 November 2015
... aura to the social scene above 110th Street. “At her ‘at homes’ Negro poets and Negro numbers banks mingled with downtown poets and seat-on-the-stock-exchange...
Journal Article
Nka Journal of Contemporary African Art (1 May 2012) 2012 (30): 98–103.
Published: 01 May 2012
... indi­ as throughout the African Diaspora. This was a vidually or as a Nation. Iterations such as “the New time in which I and many other Africans world­ Negro,” “Race Man/Woman,” “Black Intelligentsia,” wide were rethinking our relationship(s) as indi­ “UNIA” (Universal Negro Improvement Asso­...