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rubble

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Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 9–30.
Published: 01 August 2010
..., of the nation's survivors. As the rubble on the streets and the destruction in a returned soldier's mind, material damage and mental wreckage, become intertwined, the compensatory narrative suggests that both have been caused by outside forces. By scrutinizing the prominent role of rubble in the so-called rubble...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 49–72.
Published: 01 August 2010
... glimpse of the German capital in the final months after the surrender. This essay argues that this postwar glimpse of Berlin challenged Thomas Pynchon to develop representational techniques for capturing urban destruction on such a scale. Behind the rubble, the missing street signs, encyclopedic lists...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 85–113.
Published: 01 February 2011
..., but by “citing” such images, the film continues to link to the powerful discourse of victimhood that has found its expression in Dresden rubble photography. © 2011 by New German Critique, Inc. 2011 The Ruined Picture Postcard: Dresden’s Visually Encoded History and the Television Drama Dresden...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (3 (117)): 135–153.
Published: 01 November 2012
... in shaping them and about the subsequent transformations of the narratives. The evidence points to the importance of both Allies and Germans as actors, to a powerful dialectic of the rubbled space where myth formulation and claims to legitimacy could be found in areas such as housing allocation...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2024) 51 (1 (151)): 1–31.
Published: 01 February 2024
... der Tauber . See also https://docplayer.org/201383386-Rothenburg-ob-der-tauber.html (accessed February 10, 2022). Helmut Puff quotes Joseph Goebbels’s 1943 speech after the bombing of Kassel: “[After a German victory] you will march through the fields of rubble in happiness. . . . You will view...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 155–180.
Published: 01 February 2011
... of choosing between the postwar era and the Cold War and permit us to entertain the ambiguity of their legacies. Ambivalent Rubble: Beyond the Trümmerlyrik In the late 1940s and early 1950s, when a great deal of aesthetic production in both Germanies pivoted on rubble as an artistic point...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 1–7.
Published: 01 August 2010
... forms of mythical thinking that defer to fate and destiny rather than uphold the power of human agency. At the same time, Rentschler also acknowledges the extent to which this first “rubble film” addresses issues soon disavowed in a growing Cold War divide. German filmmakers were not the only...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (3 (126)): 91–114.
Published: 01 November 2015
... to Schlingensief,” 160. 12. See Jaimey Fisher, “Wandering in/to the Rubble-Film: Filmic Flânerie and the Exploded Panorama after 1945,” German Quarterly 78, no. 4 (2005): 461–80. Jaimey Fisher  95 ghettoized, in films made with female audiences in mind.13...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 1–7.
Published: 01 February 2011
... as the particular site at which to analyze the semiotic and aesthetic contestation of Cold War versus postwar at work. If urban rubble immediately became the signature signifier in postwar cultural production, it became “ambivalent rubble,” as a Cold War semiotics eventually tried to harness...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (3 (150)): 25–35.
Published: 01 November 2023
... in the air, untranslated. Ellbogen ends with a frightened Hazal crouching behind a thorny bush as tanks enter the street. The final word of Dschinns creates a stark counterpoint to the gritty, pessimistic realism of Ellbogen . Buried under rubble in the aftermath of the 7.6 magnitude earthquake...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (1 (139)): 173–195.
Published: 01 February 2020
..., the rubble film (as well as its remaking by Rainer Fassbinder)—in a continuation of Petzold’s project ( Fisher, “Petzold’s Phoenix , Fassbinder’s Maria Braun ” ; Staat, “Christian Petzold’s Melodramas” ). 25. Young, “Past Is Not Myself,” 41. In a more literal sense, the title is a reference...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 45–60.
Published: 01 November 2007
...- geon, wanders aimlessly through the rubble of Berlin as though it were the landscape of his own mind—he is “symptomatic,” like many war returnees in postwar fi lm. Staudte repeatedly shows close-ups of Hans’s face, which registers only contempt for life and for himself. He speaks apathetically...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 31–47.
Published: 01 August 2010
...- fect,” which appropriately became the title of a Wilder biography and finally even his epitaph.16 Whereas Wilder may have started out to make a propaganda film through entertainment, the end result is a wonderfully outlandish com- bination of rubble film, romantic comedy, and biting social satire...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 65–84.
Published: 01 February 2011
... lay in rubble.14 While one of the produc- ers’ claims that Auschwitz is written all over the film is certainly exaggerated, Dresden deserves credit for the subplot of Simon Goldberg and his German wife, Maria Goldberg (most likely inspired by the story of Victor Klemperer, who survived...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 135–153.
Published: 01 February 2011
... pages to “the air war,” including dramatic photos of civilians amid the rubble of destroyed cities. While the text briefly mentions German attacks on Britain and the Netherlands in 1940, it focuses squarely on the suffering of German men and women at the war’s end. Nowhere is the emphasis...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (1 (100)): 165–187.
Published: 01 February 2007
... on the world. The destructive character obliterates even the traces of destruction.” The destructive character gets rid of “auratic” tradition, of those traces the bourgeois can only leave in plush; “what exists he reduces to rubble—not for the sake of the rubble, but for that of the way leading through...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (2 (146)): 161–186.
Published: 01 August 2022
...–era plot of nuclear destruction, the Hotel Luxor can be read as a striking embodiment of the entangled spatial-historical dynamics identified in Kracauer’s 1940s writings. With no reference to the East-West geopolitical divide and scant attention to the leftover rubble of war, however, Lang’s...
FIGURES
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 65–76.
Published: 01 August 2006
... Saxony, Germany, who emerged from the rubble of World War II to immerse himself in the cultural politics of a major communist state; the other a politically naive and dedi- cated individualist from Waco, Texas, of the 1950s, committed to the com- mercial success of his art and career. What drew...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2018) 45 (1 (133)): 23–47.
Published: 01 February 2018
..., res], its blessing or its curse, will be determined by the reality of the imperium romanum, which still exists beneath the rubble. This will be true even if anarchy and ignorance, as the consequences of spiritual decline, are so great that they either mock or fail to see these real...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (2 (122)): 83–95.
Published: 01 August 2014
... of the mind,” things revealed through cinema that would otherwise be overlooked, including refuse:25 “Objects that push the film’s aesthetic toward the ‘formless’: images of trash, detritus, rubble, waste—literally, the abject” (“Tracking,” 605). Han- sen argues that American films of the Depression...