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Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 21–41.
Published: 01 November 2022
... of the novel’s reception assumes, Weiss plays subversively with mask narration. The narrator’s selective reading of Théodore Géricault’s The Raft of the Medusa guides readers to a complex assessment of the costs and deformations necessitated by the narrator’s promise to remain part of the antifascist resistance...
FIGURES
Image
Published: 01 November 2022
Figure 1. Théodore Géricault, The Raft of the Medusa (1818–19). Oil on canvas, 491 × 716 cm. Louvre, Paris. CC BY 2.0. More
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 135–157.
Published: 01 November 2022
... as well as pivotal chapters of European political history to model processes of resistance formation. Weiss’s extensive remediation of Théodore Géricault’s painting The Raft of the Medusa in the transition from volume 1 to volume 2 and the political debate that The Aesthetics ’ narrator stages between...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 113–133.
Published: 01 November 2022
... the long blocks of prose Weiss settled on for the novel. Exemplified in volume 2’s opening confrontation with Théodore Géricault’s painting The Raft of the Medusa , this search within the narrative vacillates between constituting erect forms and leveling them altogether. With the aid of Georges Bataille...
FIGURES
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 1–20.
Published: 01 November 2022
... of by—albeit affiliated by historical circumstances with—its author” ( F , 25). When the young workers and students in The Aesthetics of Resistance look at the Gigantomachy in the Pergamon museum, read Dante’s Divine Comedy , or examine Théodore Géricault’s The Raft of the Medusa , they are fully aware...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 65–91.
Published: 01 November 2022
... library also contains reproductions of other paintings. Eugène Délacroix’s Liberty Leading the People (1830) and Théodore Géricault’s The Raft of the Medusa (1818–19) are introduced as counterpoints to Guernica and afforded similar textual foldouts. A first description of the visual composition...
FIGURES
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 159–185.
Published: 01 November 2022
... The Raft of the Medusa , Picasso’s Guernica , and the Hellenistic Gigantomachy relief on the Pergamon Altar. The focus in this article is on a different kind of work of a broadly realist character to which Weiss was attracted, one depicting generic situations rather than singular events or dramatic...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (3 (126)): 115–143.
Published: 01 November 2015
... scenery, which this time shares a striking similarity with Caspar David Friedrich’s Ostra Preserve (1832): a wide river flows peacefully in the fog; solemn hill slopes emerge in the background beyond a row of trees, with small rafts crossing leisurely. Shortly thereafter, however, as the fog...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (3 (141)): 45–57.
Published: 01 November 2020
... to the threatened and wary? Let go . It is ironic that these primitive forms of evaluative précis—long the target of dumbing-down fuss—are now clung to like life rafts. This too represents a recurring theme in the history of critical discourse. Roger Ebert, once vilified as the epitome of criticism’s depreciation...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (3 (147)): 215–229.
Published: 01 November 2022
... . “ Europäische Peripherie .” Kursbuch , no. 2 ( 1965 ): 154 – 73 . Enzensberger Hans Magnus . “ Peter Weiss and Others ,” translated by Howes Seth . New German Critique , no. 147 ( 2022 ): 237 – 41 . Evers Kai . “ Looking Away: On Théodore Gericault’s The Raft of the Medusa...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (3 (126)): 9–40.
Published: 01 November 2015
... the economic landscape. The state, meanwhile, exer- cised increasingly close control over its citizens. Thanks to the 1922 Youth Welfare Law, the 1924 National Welfare Decree, and a raft of initiatives on the municipal level, the state found itself more involved in welfare—espe- cially children’s welfare...