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hamlet

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Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (3 (129)): 175–201.
Published: 01 November 2016
...George Oppitz-Trotman This article asks why Theodor W. Adorno never wrote anything substantial about William Shakespeare's play Hamlet , given its importance to German culture and to philosophical traditions in which Adorno worked rigorously. It addresses how Adorno tacitly adopted a Hamlet...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 103–118.
Published: 01 August 2012
... simultaneously function as symptoms of a profound contemporary crisis: in mobilizing unaccommodated, unrealized, or taboo aspects of the GDR past, but also in presenting an aesthetic opportunity in that they “recall” the various intertexts they cite (from Hamlet to Karl Marx or the medieval danse macabre...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 77–100.
Published: 01 August 2006
... production of Hamlet. Featuring a diverse cast of established performers— Paul Wegener as Polonius, Heinrich Greif as Fortinbras, and Horst Caspar as Hamlet—Wangenheimʼs production offered Hamlet as an allegory for the German nation looking to rebuild itself. This was certainly not the fi rst time...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (1 (124)): 99–128.
Published: 01 February 2015
... Christopher Conti No! I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be. —T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” Hamlet has long afforded us a gratifying image of ourselves as moderns. In revolt against the establishment, Hamlet’s daring...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (2 (113)): 1–23.
Published: 01 August 2011
... ofWallenstein so dread- ful? High as the death toll is at the play’s conclusion, it is no higher than that of Antigone, Hamlet, and The Robbers, three plays that Hegel often cites without objecting that they depict death rising up against and triumphing over life. What then makes the end of Wallenstein...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (2 (119)): 167–184.
Published: 01 August 2013
... in his 1990 production Hamlet/Machine at the Berliner Ensemble, which combined his translation of Shakespeare with his own deconstruction of the text. As he explained it, the appearance of Fortinbras and the disposition of Hamlet’s body at the end of the play were greatly influenced...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 65–76.
Published: 01 August 2006
... not understand Hamlet- maschine, nor did he fi nd it necessary to remedy the problem or even worry about it.15 Viewed in that light, he appears less antitextual than hermeneuti- cally agnostic in that he approaches Müllerʼs literary text much the same way he views his own visual creations, where he...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 15–47.
Published: 01 August 2006
... with Alexander Weigel, “Etwas für das Programmheft,” in Regie, Heiner Müller: Material zu Der Lohndrücker 1988 Hamlet/Maschine 1990 Mauser 1991, am Deutschen Theater Berlin, ed. Martin Linzer and Peter Ullrich (Berlin: Zentrum für Theater- dokumentation und -information, 1993), 26–28; the relevant source...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (3 (141)): iii–xiv.
Published: 01 November 2020
... as a presence , both physical and intellectual. Really, those elements refuse to be separated: the lean of the torso over the seminar table in explanation of the “inability to mourn”; the inversion of hands and the tips of impossibly long fingers in pinning down The Hamlet Machine for just a moment...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (3 (129)): 27–52.
Published: 01 November 2016
... the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief. —Shakespeare, Hamlet The Sure Reward Most people learn about opera by going to the opera, but that is the hard way, and, with Richard Wagner, it is also the long way. “Three or four hours,” Mark Twain...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 1–14.
Published: 01 August 2006
.... And, where this was not enough, the machine took over the work of distraction: “Iʼm going home and kill some time, at one / With my undivided self” (Hamlet- maschine) or “May the mob mount itself in passing, their time is expensive, itʼs costing us money, our noble profession is to kill time...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 49–64.
Published: 01 August 2006
...”—from El Periférico de Objetosʼs deeply Argentinian Máquina Hamlet (1995) to City Garageʼs deeply American MedeaText: Los Angeles/Despoiled Shore (2000) and Frederick of Prussia/ George Wʼs Dream of Sleep (2001), to Mudrooroo Naroginʼs deeply Austra- lian The Aboriginal Protesters Confront...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (2 (101)): 45–94.
Published: 01 August 2007
... referred to Hamlet—and the youthful sense of basic trust in the community/nation is ruptured. An identity crisis arises, and the relation between the generations is reversed. The young “tell the old whether the life as represented by the old and as presented to the young has meaning...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (2 (140)): 1–20.
Published: 01 August 2020
... Extravagance,” 90 . 9. The titles and cover art of three recent books about postwar culture may demonstrate this point. Mary Cosgrove’s Born under Auschwitz: Melancholy Traditions in Postwar German Literature features Édouard Manet’s painting of Hamlet standing surprised, his sword pointing...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (3 (129)): 203–222.
Published: 01 November 2016
... on in mutilated form—as what Adorno sometimes refers to as das Hinzutretende, the additional factor, residue of “irrationality” in “rationalizing” reason itself. See History and Freedom, 234, for a discussion of this in reference to Hamlet. 16. Jay rightly notes that Adorno follows Alfred Sohn-Rethel...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2008) 35 (1 (103)): 65–81.
Published: 01 February 2008
..., minutes before the Armenian’s revelation. The seemingly inexplicable coincidence is commented on by the Prince with Hamlet’s words: “There are more things in heav’n and earth / than are dreamt of in your phi- losophy” (G 591/4). 4. On Der Geisterseher as “Aufsatz” see Schiller to Christian...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (2 (101)): 115–141.
Published: 01 August 2007
... with a smile the wrath of Achilles, the conflict of Hamlet, the false alternatives of Faust. It would have to work its way up to its material, in every sense, “from below,” and if that material were viewed through a different lens than in the past, it might reveal hitherto unrecognised...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (1 (118)): 65–92.
Published: 01 February 2013
... some of the shame it reflects and inspires, the reader cannot help but wonder if what Nora’s 38. T. S. Eliot, “Hamlet and His Problems,” in The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criti- cism (London: Methuen, 1928), 100–101. Joel Burges  87...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (2 (125)): 1–29.
Published: 01 August 2015
... to a model of a haunted present, signaled explicitly in the title of her volume (taken from Hamlet). Most recently, the cultural critic Mark Fisher’s Ghosts of My Life (2014) simi- larly opposes a terrain of “lost futures” to the backward-looking “hauntology,” which he sees as fundamental...