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Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (2 (119)): 137–165.
Published: 01 August 2013
...James A. Van Dyke This article examines the exiled German artist George Grosz's Interregnum , a print portfolio published in New York in 1936, in particular Grosz's depiction of the interrogation and torture of political prisoners such as Erich Mühsam in the concentration camps established after...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 5–51.
Published: 01 August 2009
... photomontages, here he avoided the photographic basis of film because it lent itself all too easily to prowar propaganda. His work with George Grosz, by contrast, attempted to reinsert somatic terror into representations of the war and thereby to counter the visually sedative aspect of contemporary German war...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 125–142.
Published: 01 February 2017
... with regard to works once declared “degenerate” also raises ethical questions. The Grosz v. MoMA case that played out between 2006 and 2010 involved three pictures by George Grosz in the MoMA collection for which the artist’s heirs say he was never paid.40 The three works had a complicated history...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 1–4.
Published: 01 August 2009
... by Leah Dicker- man and shown at the National Gallery in Washington, DC; the Centre Pom- pidou in Paris; and the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 2005–6. This exhibition focused on the various sites of Dada activities, from Zürich (Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara) via Berlin (Heartfi eld, George Grosz...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (2 (131)): 41–73.
Published: 01 August 2017
... : Viking . ———. 1985 . “Eröffnungs-Manifest, 1. Dada-Abend.” In Dada in Zürich , edited by Bolliger Hans Magnaguagno Guido Meyer Raimund , 256 . Zürich : Kunsthaus Zürich . Beals Kurt . 2013 . “Text and the City: George Grosz, Neue Jugend, and the Political Power...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 109–123.
Published: 01 February 2017
... unreasonably delays bringing the claim to the prejudice of the defendant—have played key roles in Holocaust-era cases in the United States and indeed more often than not have been the single rea- son that otherwise meritorious Holocaust claims have failed. For example, in Grosz v. Museum of Modern Art...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (2 (137)): 171–195.
Published: 01 August 2019
..., the traditional critical stance, allied with the “hermeneutics of suspicion,” has tended to exempt the critic’s own position from critical scrutiny while becoming a master narrative of its own, seemingly unable or unwilling to think critically about its own premises. 20 As Elizabeth Grosz writes: “Critique...
FIGURES
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 53–88.
Published: 01 August 2009
... and execut- ing tens of millions. Why Heartfi eld chose not to leave the Communist Party, as did his friend and fellow artist George Grosz, is a complicated question.15 13. Eric Weitz, Creating German Communism, 1890–1990 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton Univer- sity Press, 1997), 235. 14...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (3 (99)): 209–233.
Published: 01 November 2006
... show, / Watch out!” George Grosz warned readers of an expressionist review in 1918.33 In this early example of poetic montage, which included inserts of snippets from advertising slogans and popular songs, Grosz suggested how Luna Park acted as a heterotopian space to represent, contest...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (2 (137)): 221–252.
Published: 01 August 2019
... in the past. Philosophers like Elizabeth Grosz and Jane Bennett have recently found inspiration for a “new materialism” in the neovitalist holism of the early twentieth-century German theoretical biologists. 48 Goldberg and Heidegger also found in this work a confirmation of their deep distrust...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 185–205.
Published: 01 August 2009
... of L’humanité; and Josep Renau, both graphic artist and editor of Orto. In addition, the following illustrated magazines reproduced Heartfi eld’s montages: Regards (Paris), Mariane (Paris), Nueva cultura (Spain), Mono azul (Spain), and Frente a Frente (Mexico). 10. See Barbara McCloskey, George Grosz...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (3 (108)): 133–160.
Published: 01 November 2009
... Bücklin, Pierre Bonnard, Edouard Manet, Pablo Picasso, Ferdinand Hodler, James Ensor, Edvard Munch, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Max Beckmann, Philip Gus- ton, Robert Crumb, Gerhard Richter, Jörg Immendorff, Martin Kippenberger, and Peter Doig. Kay Heymer, rather harshly, labeled Richter’s...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 35–55.
Published: 01 February 2017
... Dürer, Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Paul Klee, and many New German Critique 130, Vol. 44, No. 1, February 2017 DOI 10.1215/0094033X-3705685  © 2017 by New German Critique, Inc. 35 36  Hildebrand Gurlitt and German...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 209–227.
Published: 01 August 2010
.... Radically modernist and apoca- lyptic images of the Great War and its effects abounded in the 1920s. The mutilated veterans of George Grosz populated the painting of the Weimar Republic, and Otto Dix’s images of the trenches join in our imagination with the narrative of Erich Maria Remarque’s antiwar...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (2 (101)): 95–114.
Published: 01 August 2007
... recently released film, whimsically titledMax , which presents Hitler as a struggling artist in post–World War I Munich, the contemporary of Georg Grosz, Otto Dix, and Max Ernst. The film, starring John Cusack in the fictitious role of Max Rothmann, a Jewish art dealer who befriends Hitler...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (3 (120)): 41–64.
Published: 01 November 2013
... liberty or through outright sex- ual domination. As Rowe notes, the violent sexual imagery in paintings by George Grosz, Otto Dix, and others functioned as a “literal depiction of the punitive consequences for women who step out of rigidly defined bourgeois spheres of the private...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (1 (115)): 3–26.
Published: 01 February 2012
.... 16. Rousseau, “Origin,” 14. 17. Ibid., 15. 18. Interestingly, in the Talmudic tradition, the word as name, davar, is not distinct from the thing it names but designates both word and life, representation and reality. See Elizabeth Grosz, “Judaism and Exile: The Ethics of Otherness,” New...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (3 (108)): 39–71.
Published: 01 November 2009
... University Press, 2003). In World War I and the Weimar Artists: Dix, Grosz, Beckmann, Schlemmer (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1985), Mattias Eberle discusses the difference between Germans, on the one hand, and, on the other, the Italian futurists and French cubists, for whom the polar values...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2018) 45 (2 (134)): 33–66.
Published: 01 August 2018
... of Capitalism ). However, Dix, who claimed to be uninterested in politics, did not give the drawing this title. John Heartfield and George Grosz, editors of the left-wing magazine Die Pleite ( Bankruptcy ) and active members of the Communist Party, retitled the drawing when the magazine published it. Dix “had...
FIGURES | View All (10)
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 169–203.
Published: 01 February 2017
..., “Ruins of the Avant-Garde,” 76. 178  Hermann Glöckner George Grosz. Artists able to travel to West Berlin—and the majority were— could have seen several major pop art exhibitions that took place at the Neue Nationalgalerie from the late 1960s onward. For example, in 1969 an exhibi- tion...