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Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (1 (118)): 199–205.
Published: 01 February 2013
...Felicitas von Lovenberg In a conversation with Felicitas von Lovenberg of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung published on April 13, 2012, Fritz Stern gives his reaction to Günter Grass's controversial poem on Israel, “What Must Be Said,” first published in April 2012 in the Süddeutsche Zeitung...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2008) 35 (2 (104)): 139–169.
Published: 01 August 2008
... production of post-Wende Berlin novels. Friedrich Christian Delius's Die Flatterzunge (1999), Günter Grass's Ein weites Feld (1995), Wladimir Kaminer's Schönhauser Allee (2001), and Tanja Dückers's Spielzone (1999) respond and contribute to the history and memory debates that renegotiated the memory...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (3 (108)): 109–131.
Published: 01 November 2009
... of culture because they serve as a universal, neutral medium in contrast to particular religious or ideological worldviews and most especially religious “fundamentalism” is questioned through a discussion of texts by Günter Grass, Jürgen Habermas, Martti Koskenniemi, Carl Schmitt, and Tzvetan Todorov...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (2 (125)): 1–29.
Published: 01 August 2015
... and Old-Age Style in Günter Grass, Ruth Klüger, Christa Wolf, and Martin Walser: The Mannerism of a Late Period (Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2013), esp. 1–10. The German Center for Gerontology in Berlin has comprehensive holdings on aging in Germany. See Deutsches Zentrum für Altersfragen...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (2 (125)): 97–113.
Published: 01 August 2015
... to generalize from the author’s biographical impetus to universal concerns such as our human nature, self and other, memory and forgetting, self-obsession and altruism, and, of course, aging and dying. (The later work of other “political” writers, for example, Günter Grass, Heiner Müller, Volker...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (1 (97)): 179–190.
Published: 01 February 2006
... is “driven out the gate of civilisation,” to the shot that seems to strike dead two unsuspecting rabbits in the grass, it is not here a question of the malignity that lurks in the abyss of childhood, down into which “melancholy irresistibly draws one under.”9 Adorno speaks of happy 7. Jürgen...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (3 (150)): 205–215.
Published: 01 November 2023
... telling, Hitler’s rise to power was no accident; it expressed a nationalist and expansionist tendency that had shaped the entire history of modern Germany. Around the same time, Günter Grass proposed his own allegory of this abnormal development by telling the story of Oskar Matzerath, the hero...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 95–106.
Published: 01 August 2010
... directly after the so-called zero hour of German his- tory are not the focus of much attention anymore except, of course, in rela- tion to the Third Reich period that immediately preceded theirs. One recent example of this post quem phenomenon is the rather belated disclosure of Günter Grass’s SS...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 135–160.
Published: 01 August 2006
... the signifi cance of Sebaldʼs shift in attention to German suffering and keeps 18. Richard Herzinger, “Moral liegt in der Luft,” Tagesspiegel, January 6, 2003, archiv.tagesspiegel .de/archiv/06.01.2003/379513.asp; Gustav Seibt, “Im Herzen: Von Grass bis Walser: Der Pazifi smus ist sprachlos...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 155–180.
Published: 01 February 2011
... Yuliya Komska “Postwar” or “Cold War” “It doesn’t end. Never will it end.”1 Günter Grass’s much-cited dictum from his novel Crabwalk not only points to the endless course of history and hyper- linked circulation of memory but also invokes a chronological instability pecu- liar to the German era...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 209–227.
Published: 01 August 2010
..., such as Wolfgang Koeppen’s novels Pigeons on the Grass (1951; trans. 1988) and Death in Rome (1954; trans. 1961), confronted explicitly and in for- mally demanding ways what W. G. Sebald has called “the real state of material and moral ruin in which the country found itself.”2 As denazification was cut...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (2 (128)): 55–82.
Published: 01 August 2016
... of wolves throughout Central Europe, stands in sharp contrast to photographs of Genghis led on a leash throughout Berlin, including one in which he and Grzimek wait patiently to board the tram. “Certainly wolves do not live on grass and hay,” Grzimek noted, “but the statistics always have two...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (2 (101)): 45–94.
Published: 01 August 2007
..., had joined the Nazi Party on April 20, 1944. In   9. Stuart Taberner, “‘Normalization’ and the New Consensus on the Nazi Past: Günter Grass’s Im Krebsgang and the Problem of German Wartime Suffering,” Oxford German Studies 31 (2002): 161–86; Mitchell G. Ash, “Becoming Normal, Modern...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 135–153.
Published: 01 February 2011
...). 138 Teaching Trauma and Responsibility suffering for more than fifty years.5 These claims gained further credence with the support of the Nobel laureate Günter Grass, whose 2002 novel Crabwalk reignited popular debates about German suffering and extended these discus- sions beyond...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 1–8.
Published: 01 November 2014
... and much more brutal truth. It is understandable that during the immediate postwar era Günter Grass and Heinrich Böll wrote about their own traumas—their own difficult military service and the distress caused by Germany’s defeat—before they attended to those of others. Unresponsiveness to Jewish...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (3 (150)): 225–235.
Published: 01 November 2023
.... These aspirations guide current rewilding projects, most notably, Pleistocene Park in eastern Siberia. There the release of large herbivores will hopefully result in the ecologically beneficial restoration of the grass-dominated mammoth steppe of the Pleistocene. Mobilized as key agents in a comprehensive feat...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (2 (128)): 177–197.
Published: 01 August 2016
... and Lit- erature; Goethe—Nietzsche—Grass. Amsterdam: Rodopi. Mentz, Steve. 2012. “After Sustainability.” PMLA 127, no. 3: 586–92. Metcalf, Jacob, and Thom van Dooren, eds. 2012. “Temporal Environments: Rethinking Time and Ecology.” Special issue. Environmental Philosophy 9, no. 1. Morton...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (1 (109)): 75–98.
Published: 01 February 2010
... published—Uwe Johnson’s Mutmaßungen über Jacob (Spec- ulations about Jakob), Heinrich Böll’s Billard um halb zehn (Billiards at Half- Past Nine), and Günter Grass’s Die Blechtrommel (The Tin Drum)—Roehler is the child of Klaus Roehler and Gisela Elsner. The elder Roehler worked as an editor...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (3 (138)): 125–155.
Published: 01 November 2019
... complex. 6 Homo Sapiens (2016) archives the deserted places left behind from atomic contamination, the collapse of communism, and the regression of the welfare state; only the sounds of swaying grasses, chirping birds, and blowing winds suffuse the abandoned sites. Geyrhalter’s other works...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (3 (150)): 119–131.
Published: 01 November 2023
...-facing scholarship in English on German literature hardly changes the definition and perception of German literature. Oxford University Press’s Very Short Introduction to German Literature (2008) ends with Günter Grass in the 1990s and calls the East German author Durs Grünbein’s poetry the most...