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empathy

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Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 143–167.
Published: 01 February 2017
...), attempts to fuse the discursive with the sensuous and visual. It thereby aims to reverse a modern trend toward increasingly abstract or conceptual thought. Criticism should instead rely on empathy for historical artworks, whose appreciation is meant to foster the public's feeling of being at home in the...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 17–44.
Published: 01 November 2007
... forms of cathexis, and of empathy in particular. If genera- tions defi ne themselves, among other things, through the emotional relation- ship to particular “generational objects,” as Habbo Knoch has argued, then the shifting role of the Holocaust, Hitler, and Nazi Germany as such objects reveals a...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 61–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
... expressions, their body language, the pitch of their voices, and their wording betray what they try to hide (fi g. 5). The intelligibility of the characters is the basis of the viewers’ empathy, which is intensifi ed by the fact that the interviewees face the camera and also by the special resonance of...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (2 (131)): 25–40.
Published: 01 August 2017
... Ben- jamin’s view, a shock effect that failed to disturb the social sphere could pro- duce empathy but not astonishment, without which there could be no agitation. The importance of interruption as an instrument for political persuasion can- not be underestimated for him. Of Heartfield...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (3 (117)): 5–8.
Published: 01 November 2012
... unrelated to that position, as I see it, Andy’s work developed through an “empathic critique”—empathy understood not as cofeeling but as “vicari- ous imaginative introspection”6—of the grandiose redemptive claims of the Left even as he deeply identified with them. He recognized the danger and the...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (1 (118)): 199–205.
Published: 01 February 2013
... has taken, I am troubled by the accusation that he is anti-Semitic. In The Tin Drum there is a [Jewish] character called Sigismund Markus, a toyshop owner, who, if I remember correctly, commits suicide in the end: it is so mag- nificent, written with such empathy, more powerful...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (1 (127)): 59–89.
Published: 01 February 2016
... possibilities for empathetic solidarity. While Clauss’s reactionary physiognomics focused on reading facial expressions as indications of discrete, racially determined experiential styles that prevent true empathy between the races, Balázs used physiognomic perception to promote leftist revolutionary...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 179–197.
Published: 01 November 2014
... past and is able to separate it from its present condition. Such a process helps the members of that society recognize the differences between themselves, on the one hand, and the survivors of the traumatic event, on the other, and by so doing develop a real empathy toward those survivors. Thus...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 35–55.
Published: 01 November 2014
... Westerbork images. Owing to the complicated story behind the film’s genesis, the images’ “reality content,” in a Brechtian sense, needs to be investigated. Farocki is aware that the mechanism of empathy is activated through reality effects. In his film, however, empathy for the victims becomes only...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (1 (106)): 1–19.
Published: 01 February 2009
... perpetrator’s inner life. The extended representation of a character’s subjectivity—not only actions but feelings, perceptions, opinions, and way of being in the world—necessarily requires a degree of empathy, on the part of both author and reader; even if the character is loathsome, he or she must at...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (1 (106)): 21–34.
Published: 01 February 2009
... informed. The members of the SS who appear and the events that Littell describes all existed. And yet: from the perpetrator’s perspective? The possibility of empathy? “Is one allowed to do that?” Not here, where we’re used to rules, to books written from the victims’ perspectives; where we have...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 119–132.
Published: 01 August 2012
... realization of the telos of a world history, such nostalgia was an undesirable bourgeois atavism and as such an intolerable provocation. However, although Tellkamp’s narrator has much empathy for his characters, he also ironizes their engage- ment with a lost past, precisely because it invokes the...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 1–8.
Published: 01 November 2014
... and often-cited silence about the catastrophe came mostly from non-Jews.22 Finally, Thomas Kohut’s recent study A German Generation: An Experiential History of the Twentieth Century relies on a large number of interviews to detail the wartime genera - tion’s lack of empathy for the victims.23...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (1 (115)): 139–167.
Published: 01 February 2012
... between friends and enemies. Thus an organization of affect that can be char- acterized by the nexus of personability–empathy–good feelings can be con- 20. Hasselbach, for example, describes his role leading an attack on an antifascist house: “Shortly after my return from Rostock . . . I...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 231–252.
Published: 01 August 2009
... archaic instincts break open. Such situations in this story range from genocide (Tasmania; Chronik, 1:971–76) to acts of revenge (Chronik, 1:976–78) and instinctive forms of empathy (Chronik, 1:960–63). The latter is the subject matter of the collection’s centerpiece, a picture story that...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (2 (128)): 105–126.
Published: 01 August 2016
...  Eudemonic Arguments Among the list of human capabilities that Martha Nussbaum suggests is the capability to live in a relationship marked by empathy and concern with plants, animals, and the natural world.31 The capacity for such concern and emphatic coexistence with natural beings can be...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2015) 42 (3 (126)): 91–114.
Published: 01 November 2015
... (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1976). 19. Williams, “Melodrama Revised,” 49–50, 54. Jaimey Fisher  97 moral situation generally, in ways that not only generate empathy and identifi- cation with the innocent but also encourage a broader judgment...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 9–34.
Published: 01 November 2014
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (3 (114)): 79–93.
Published: 01 November 2011
... under- standing and, in his states, from empathy. Thereby the question imposes itself as to how such a subject can gather a community around himself at all and how he can win over his followers. This can be seen in an episode in which Wang, after leaving his parents, enters a first social...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 103–118.
Published: 01 August 2012
... based on personal memory. According to Elsaesser’s less hopeful perspective, the transmission of memories via such media speaks not to the development of empathy and new social alliances (via mourning) but to cultural obsession and traumatic reiteration. In this it also offers an alternative...