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empathy

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Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (1 (130)): 143–167.
Published: 01 February 2017
...), attempts to fuse the discursive with the sensuous and visual. It thereby aims to reverse a modern trend toward increasingly abstract or conceptual thought. Criticism should instead rely on empathy for historical artworks, whose appreciation is meant to foster the public's feeling of being at home...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 17–44.
Published: 01 November 2007
..., and of empathy in particular. If genera- tions defi ne themselves, among other things, through the emotional relation- ship to particular “generational objects,” as Habbo Knoch has argued, then the shifting role of the Holocaust, Hitler, and Nazi Germany as such objects reveals a putative change...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (2 (146)): 107–132.
Published: 01 August 2022
.... 2022 domestic violence empathy object relations theory perspective free indirect discourse “The beggar-child sat in the snow, yet did not freeze. The child had received a beating at home, why, the beggar-child did not know.” 1 To those who grew up with violence in the family...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2021) 48 (3 (144)): 65–98.
Published: 01 November 2021
... discourse. Indeed, can the rise of the “sympathetic Nazi” as a popular protagonist and the “lively intellectual engagement with perpetrators” be viewed as unrelated phenomena? 2 I further argue that the fixation on “empathy” with, and “humanization” of, the perpetrators that has come about in fiction...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 61–74.
Published: 01 November 2007
..., their facial expressions, their body language, the pitch of their voices, and their wording betray what they try to hide (fi g. 5). The intelligibility of the characters is the basis of the viewers’ empathy, which is intensifi ed by the fact that the interviewees face the camera and also by the special...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (2 (149)): 181–207.
Published: 01 August 2023
... on maintaining an interpersonal distance, as it enlists “empathy rather than sympathy” ( T , 127). Sennett defines both terms and their distinction from each other in the following way: while sympathy is eliminating the distance between self and other through an act of identification (“putting oneself...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2017) 44 (2 (131)): 25–40.
Published: 01 August 2017
... view, a shock effect that failed to disturb the social sphere could pro- duce empathy but not astonishment, without which there could be no agitation. The importance of interruption as an instrument for political persuasion can- not be underestimated for him. Of Heartfield, Benjamin says...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (1 (118)): 199–205.
Published: 01 February 2013
... is anti-Semitic. In The Tin Drum there is a [Jewish] character called Sigismund Markus, a toyshop owner, who, if I remember correctly, commits suicide in the end: it is so mag- nificent, written with such empathy, more powerful than almost any other story from that period...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (1 (127)): 59–89.
Published: 01 February 2016
... possibilities for empathetic solidarity. While Clauss’s reactionary physiognomics focused on reading facial expressions as indications of discrete, racially determined experiential styles that prevent true empathy between the races, Balázs used physiognomic perception to promote leftist revolutionary...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 179–197.
Published: 01 November 2014
... present condition. Such a process helps the members of that society recognize the differences between themselves, on the one hand, and the survivors of the traumatic event, on the other, and by so doing develop a real empathy toward those survivors. Thus the working- through processes described...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2022) 49 (1 (145)): 97–130.
Published: 01 February 2022
... to above. Both the evolutionary anthropologist Sarah Hrdy and the primatologist Frans de Waal speak directly to the role of emotional orientation in anthropogenesis. 57 According to de Waal, empathy is deeply wired into older parts of the mammalian brain, 58 which means that it, too, preceded...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (3 (117)): 5–8.
Published: 01 November 2012
... see it, Andy’s work developed through an “empathic critique”—empathy understood not as cofeeling but as “vicari- ous imaginative introspection”6—of the grandiose redemptive claims of the Left even as he deeply identified with them. He recognized the danger and the appeal of messianic, absolute...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (1 (115)): 139–167.
Published: 01 February 2012
... mixture of plea- sure and violence associated with Hasselbach’s intensely politicized distinction between friends and enemies. Thus an organization of affect that can be char- acterized by the nexus of personability–empathy–good feelings can be con- 20. Hasselbach, for example, describes his...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (1 (106)): 1–19.
Published: 01 February 2009
... life. The extended representation of a character’s subjectivity—not only actions but feelings, perceptions, opinions, and way of being in the world—necessarily requires a degree of empathy, on the part of both author and reader; even if the character is loathsome, he or she must at least...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 35–55.
Published: 01 November 2014
..., the images’ “reality content,” in a Brechtian sense, needs to be investigated. Farocki is aware that the mechanism of empathy is activated through reality effects. In his film, however, empathy for the victims becomes only one among several approaches he takes to the material. The film...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (1 (106)): 21–34.
Published: 01 February 2009
... informed. The members of the SS who appear and the events that Littell describes all existed. And yet: from the perpetrator’s perspective? The possibility of empathy? “Is one allowed to do that?” Not here, where we’re used to rules, to books written from the victims’ perspectives; where we have...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 119–132.
Published: 01 August 2012
... was an undesirable bourgeois atavism and as such an intolerable provocation. However, although Tellkamp’s narrator has much empathy for his characters, he also ironizes their engage- ment with a lost past, precisely because it invokes the myth of Dresden as a depoliticized space of a cultural purity...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 9–34.
Published: 01 November 2014
... (abandoned suitcases) for people. Adorno further argues that “the inability to identify with others was unquestionably the most important psychological condition [for genocide31 Here he makes the case for empathy, in contrast to the superficial and compulsoryBindung he describes earlier in his...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (1 (148)): 103–128.
Published: 01 February 2023
... be receptive to the “shock” of epic theater ( SW , 4:306). Whereas fascism offers a dream-filled sleep, epic theater loosens the tight stranglehold of the dream over the sleeper, inducing a distance through a shock that enables an awakening. Shock happens when the audience’s readiness for empathy...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 231–252.
Published: 01 August 2009
... from genocide (Tasmania; Chronik, 1:971–76) to acts of revenge (Chronik, 1:976–78) and instinctive forms of empathy (Chronik, 1:960–63). The latter is the subject matter of the collection’s centerpiece, a picture story that features various spectacular rescue actions. This collage...