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dog

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Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (1 (97)): 159–178.
Published: 01 February 2006
... for whom animals are the receptacles of the repressed incestual desire. In Tieck’s story ‘Fair Eckbert,’ the forgotten name of a little dog, Strohmi, stands for a mys- terious guilt.” “Strohmi” is etymologically related to the German word Strom, which means “river,” and to the river Lethe, the river...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (1 (106)): 61–81.
Published: 01 February 2009
... Vicissitudes of Metaphorical Thinking In Origins she speaks of “bugs,” “grasshoppers,” and “lice,” “mosquitoes” and “fl ies,” “soap” and “pimples,” an “iron band,” “fences,” “cornfi elds,” and “chess,” a “desert,” a “heart,” “poison,” an “onion,” “dogs,” and so on. Arendt ponders the question...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (2 (122)): 97–109.
Published: 01 August 2014
...—that “there are the hot dogs whose skins are pulled down and are spanked” (EC, 94). The anarchistic shifts of metaphors into metonomies are clearly shown in the film. Mickey plays a hot dog seller, running his mobile business out of a small wagon at a fair. As one of the first sound films in which Mickey...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (3 (138)): 157–179.
Published: 01 November 2019
... Hundstage ( Dog Days , 2001), a film that follows several interlinked stories set in the Vienna suburbs during a hot summer. In that film Seidl constructs a community of Viennese pariahs. Each character makes injudicious decisions and treats other people with uncommon cruelty. Dog Days , Seidl’s first...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (3 (138)): 53–78.
Published: 01 November 2019
... staged at Berlin’s Hebbel Theater in 2015. Radlmaier’s film titles are equally unusual: his feature film debut Self-Critique of a Bourgeois Dog ( Selbstkritik eines bürgerlichen Hundes , 2017) followed several short and midlength works, including The Plebeian Revolt ( Der Aufstand der Plebejer , 2010...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (3 (138)): 35–51.
Published: 01 November 2019
... that take place there. An exchange about Winfried’s decrepit dog, Willi, at the film’s beginning comes back to haunt Annegret, Winfried’s mother. Her first words in the film are “Why don’t you just put him to sleep?” Her son, whose face is suitably made up to resemble a skull and crossbones, retorts: “Well...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2018) 45 (2 (134)): 67–98.
Published: 01 August 2018
... notion of the “thing” ( Ding ) in later essays. Just as important for this genealogy are representations of objects in modernism and early film as discussed in the work of Brown and Miriam Hansen. 44. The jumping balls (“Bälle springen”) replace the dog (“Bellen, Springen”) on a phonetic level...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (3 (129)): 53–72.
Published: 01 November 2016
..., or hierarchy. (Žižek recalls, in this regard, the madly inconsistent taxonomies of Jorge Luis Borges, “brown dogs, dogs who belong to the emperor, dogs who don’t bark, and so forth—up to dogs who do not belong to this list9 It is this antidialectical conceptual hybridity, which has captured much...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (3 (120)): 1–40.
Published: 01 November 2013
... Atlas,” in The Optic of Walter Benjamin, ed. Alex Coles (London: Black Dog, 1999), 94–119; Benjamin Buchloh, “Gerhart Richter’s Atlas: The Anomic Archive,” October, no. 88 (1999): 117–45, esp. 122–34; Philippe-Alain Michaud, Aby Warburg and the Image in Motion, trans. Sophie Hawkes (New York...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 49–72.
Published: 01 August 2010
... of incendiaries from the pre- ceding waves made the place look like a badly laid-out city with the street- lights on. The small incendiaries were going down like a fistful of white rice thrown on a piece of black velvet. As Jock [the pilot] hauled the Dog [the plane] up again, I was thrown...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (2 (128)): 83–104.
Published: 01 August 2016
... University Press . Gill Anthony Lundsgaarde Erik . 2004 . “State Welfare Spending and Religiosity: A Cross-national Analysis.” Rationality and Society 16 , no. 2 : 399 – 436 . Haraway Donna . 2003 . The Companion Species Manifesto: Dogs, People, and Significant Otherness...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2019) 46 (3 (138)): 79–101.
Published: 01 November 2019
... advanced capitalist reality and probe its “constructed” quality. Julian Radlmaier’s Selbstkritik eines bürgerlichen Hundes ( Self-Criticism of a Bourgeois Dog , 2017) also presents a film within a film. Elements of magic realism such as talking birds and a selfless monk figure centrally...
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Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (2 (122)): 29–34.
Published: 01 August 2014
... it accessible and relevant to the present, can we say whether “progress” is still possible in the realm of ideas? Koch: I think it is possible to have regressions in the field of theory: the dog- matism that paralyzed Marxism, for example, and parts of psychoanalysis, and even analytic philosophy...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2007) 34 (3 (102)): 1–16.
Published: 01 November 2007
... in ‘Der Untergang’ nicht sterben sehen? Kritische Anmerkungen zu einem Film ohne Haltung,” Die Zeit, October 21, 2004. (I have used Julie Salamon’s translation of Wenders’s comment from her article “Hitler, That Fel- low with the Nice Little Dog,” New York Times, February 20, 2005.) 4. Ian Kershaw...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 103–118.
Published: 01 August 2012
..., 2005) follows directly from Tumulus and is dogged by epitaph in both a per- sonal and a political mode.23 There are many poems charting aspects of old age and the encroaching mortality of the lyric subject; one poem commemo- rates the Leipzig academic Walfried Hartinger (SP, 8), and another is set...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (3 (129)): 27–52.
Published: 01 November 2016
... refer to a dog who laughs at the cat’s craft of fiddling—that is but another sort of diddling, the sort that allows impossible feats to be accomplished, as when (following the rhyme) the cow jumped over the moon or the dish ran away with the spoon. Pulling a bogus thread from the many...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2016) 43 (2 (128)): 153–176.
Published: 01 August 2016
...; Werke, 721), Hauke risks further antagonizing his workers by rescuing the cute “little golden-haired dog” (D, 88) and taking it home to his daughter, Wienke, as a pet. While this enlightened intervention is presented as an ethical advance, Storm’s text also reveals what stands to be lost...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (3 (99)): 121–149.
Published: 01 November 2006
.... People are running, overtake each other. A dog barks. What a relief: a dog. Toward morning a cock even crows, and that is boundless comfort. Then I suddenly fall asleep. (14) Whereas the preceding excerpt emphasizes visual perception, this one stresses sound. Nevertheless, the effect...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2008) 35 (1 (103)): 145–164.
Published: 01 February 2008
... to supplant an individual’s consciousness with fabricated beliefs, memories, and even traits. “Conditioned refl exes,” Hunter explained, “could conceivably be produced to make [a man] react like [a] dog that rolled over at its trainer’s signal. . . . the Kremlin could use words as signals—any words...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (1 (139)): 197–215.
Published: 01 February 2020
...? ). She then asks her granddaughter to read aloud to her. While displaying the photographs of a female guard, the grandmother tells her the horrifying story of the guard’s dog: “She was the worst, Grandmother says. She had a dog that she set on prisoners when they collapsed during roll call. Grandmother...