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Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 9–38.
Published: 01 February 2011
... in the present, but they themselves are configured as both the new Jewish victims and the agents who mourn the Holocaust dead. The ultimate gesture in this study is to take a step beyond this Antigone paradigm as it pertains to the discourse of mourning and melancholia in relation to postwar German history...
Image
Published: 01 November 2020
Figure 3. Exploded munitions train (instead of the dead soldier) from World War I, in Rasch and Rasch, Wie bauen? , 166–67. More
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (2 (116)): 103–118.
Published: 01 August 2012
... ) and militate against amnesia or the fetishization of the real. The article concludes by asking what the return of the dead in Braun's work means for the Berlin Republic. © 2012 by New German Critique, Inc. 2012 “After the Massacre of Illusions”: Specters of the German Democratic Republic in the Work...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (2 (122)): 83–95.
Published: 01 August 2014
...Pamela Wojcik This essay considers the meaning and value of Miriam Hansen's notion of vernacular modernism through an examination of films starring the Dead End Kids. It argues that the contradictions of modernity are played out through the figure of the child in these films by balancing a kind...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 1–14.
Published: 01 August 2006
... Müllerʼs Memory Work Reed bristles Dead branches THIS TREE SHALL NOT GROW OVER ME Fish corpses Gleam in the mud Biscuit tins Manure heaps FROMMS ACT CASINO Shredded sanitary napkins The blood Of the women of Colchis.3 The location is both specifi c and unclear...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2010) 37 (2 (110)): 125–152.
Published: 01 August 2010
... was interested, specifically, in the dialogue that myth makes possible across historical time. It contains transmissions from the deep past. From this “utopia in reverse”—to borrow another formulation from Huyssen7—myth becomes in Müller the medium for a necromantic conversa- tion between living and dead...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (1 (139)): 173–195.
Published: 01 February 2020
... days of the camp sustains gunshot wounds that damage her face beyond recognition. After reconstructive surgery, she tries to find her husband, who, she subsequently and reluctantly learns, denounced her. He seems not to recognize her but sees that her similarity to Nelly (whom he believes dead) could...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (1 (97)): 31–52.
Published: 01 February 2006
... with the sacrifice of the particular to the universal, Adorno never works out precisely what the relation was. Third, elsewhere in his writ­ ings Adorno pursues the thesis that such a sacrifice includes the idea that the living is sacrificed to what is already dead, and in “Dying Today” he argues that since...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2006) 33 (2 (98)): 49–64.
Published: 01 August 2006
...Jonathan Kalb Germania 3: Gespenster am toten Mann: Heiner Müller and the Art of Posthumous Provocation Jonathan Kalb Germania 3: Gespenster am Toten Mann, or Germania 3: Ghosts at the Dead Man, is Heiner Müllerʼs posthumously published...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (3 (117)): 155–164.
Published: 01 November 2012
... and mockery to the living—to speak up for the dead.”12 He also attempts to find a way to convey the unimaginable reality: “Try to grasp the essence of its pattern of daily events, discarding your sense of horror and loathing and contempt, and find for it all a philosophic formula. For the gas...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 85–113.
Published: 01 February 2011
..., Dresden,” H-Soz-u-Kult, December 4, 2008, hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/tagungs berichte/id=2403; Friedrich Reichert, “Fakten, Dokumente und Bilder über den Luftkrieg gegen Dresden 1944/45,” Dresdner Geschichtsbuch 10 (2004): 274. The number of dead in Dresden has been heavily contested...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2021) 48 (2 (143)): 23–41.
Published: 01 August 2021
... is grasped whose truth or untruth is not grasped, and this is the concern of critique” ( AT , 128–29). Stranded by the rising tide of social domination, art and philosophy are intimate yet separate, two dark planets orbiting the same dead star. There can be no aesthetic truth content without...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (2 (149)): 1–8.
Published: 01 August 2023
... already declared himself dead, only to reinvent himself. Lukács’s early writings, inspired by both neo-Kantianism and the German vitalist movement known as Lebensphilosophie , appeared even to himself of merely faint historical interest after his conversion to Marxism in 1918. In a later foreword...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2020) 47 (1 (139)): 197–215.
Published: 01 February 2020
..., an entire patrol, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty men against women and children and shadows in the forest. The sounds of combat in the house, in the fields, in front of the stable, farms in flames, the hole in the chest of the dead partisan, mown down by a machine gun next to the front door of the house...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2023) 50 (3 (150)): 217–224.
Published: 01 November 2023
.... In book 11 of the Odyssey , Odysseus has sailed beyond the end of the world to reach the underworld, a katabatic mission fraught with danger. Sent by Circe the witch to consult with the seer Tiresias on further clues about how to make it home to Ithaca, the epic hero of reason must commune with the dead...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2009) 36 (2 (107)): 207–230.
Published: 01 August 2009
.... In the case of Meinhof, Ensslin, Baader, and Raspe, images of their dead bodies did not offer proof for the state’s explanation of their deaths: the photos do not confi rm suicide nor do they prove murder on the part of the state. These images cannot relate history or tell stories. Richter intensifi es...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2011) 38 (1 (112)): 115–134.
Published: 01 February 2011
... her brother’s film. To see her father differently than she “wants to” would challenge her memory of him; more important, it would require her to reconsider who she and her family are. Confronting the archi- val evidence would complicate or challenge her loving attachment to her dead father...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2012) 39 (3 (117)): 189–205.
Published: 01 November 2012
... for us or when we use it, the collector can be said both to be concerned with a form of possession that appears independent of the sphere of capitalist conventions and to be himself the owner of dead or at least dormant objects.14 11. In his 1935 letter to Benjamin, Adorno accuses Benjamin...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2013) 40 (2 (119)): 167–184.
Published: 01 August 2013
... by an enigmatic fragment of writing by Schmitt: Ophelia (who identifies herself in Hamletmachine as “the one the river didn’t keep”) returns to accompany Hamlet’s body offstage, when the dead Dane is transformed into the Norwegian prince. The Schmitt frag- ment simply stated that “Kafka is Fortinbras...
Journal Article
New German Critique (2014) 41 (3 (123)): 135–157.
Published: 01 November 2014
... witness’s first words areOi “ Elo­ him” (Oh God), and she then asks, “What if I see someone I know?” Her slip is noteworthy: Hersonski’s witness uses the present tense (“I know even though almost everyone she is seeing is now dead. Her response indicates the extent to which she has been returned...