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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (4): 575–578.
Published: 01 December 2007
...- and eighteenth-century France and Britain. University of Washington 2007 Dice, Cards, Wheels: A Different History of French Culture . By Thomas M. Kavanagh. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005. viii + 251 pp. Reviews Dice, Cards, Wheels: A Different History of French...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 247–257.
Published: 01 September 1955
.... PARADISELOST, Book VI . . . forth rush’d with whirl-wind sound The Chariot of Paternal Deitie, Flashing thick flames, Wheele within Wheele undrawn, It self instinct with Spirit. but convoyd By four Cherubic shapes, four Faces...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 77–83.
Published: 01 March 1968
... works, anyone who greatly admires Byron and is himself devoid of humor is bound to seem slightly ridiculous. But there is no getting round him. He har survived forty years of adulation and scorn, and very sturdily indeed. There are an impressive number of duplicate copies of The Wheel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 297–299.
Published: 01 September 1982
... conservative, is intent on no such novelty; he offers nothing incredible or radical. He recognizes that there are “certain things that recur in Marston’s plays-for example, the themes and images of lust, pride, envy, Fortune (and her wheel), disease and corruption, infidelity, and revenge” (p. 9...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 390–395.
Published: 01 December 1977
... of the wheel and its numerous symbolic meanings.3 It is a matter which has received considerable attention of recent years, and since the publication of Howard’s book an article has appeared maintaining that Chaucer dramatized the design in the character of Criseyde as both rose and wheel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (3): 400.
Published: 01 September 1949
... destiny, and all that we can do is with calm courage to hold the reins firmly, and to guide the wheels, now to the left, now to the right, avoiding a stone here, or a precipice there. Who can tell whither he is being borne? seeing he hardly remembers whence he has come” (Bohn, 11, 312...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 513–534.
Published: 01 December 1990
... in the Belfry”: Twenty years ago, at the door of every cottage sat the good woman with her spinning-wheel: the children, if not more profitably employed than in gathering heath and sticks, at least laid in a stock of health and strength to sustain the labours...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 332–333.
Published: 01 June 1941
... in the subsidiary stories, the per- sonal experiment of Reinhart is discreetly held in the background until it returns in fulfillment at the end. To visualize the “cyclical method” more concretely, the author offers a diagram of wheels within wheels to illustrate her chief ar- Copyright © 1941...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 333–334.
Published: 01 June 1941
... in fulfillment at the end. To visualize the “cyclical method” more concretely, the author offers a diagram of wheels within wheels to illustrate her chief ar- 334 R~o2‘cws gunient, namely, that the seven subsidiary stories of the Sinngedicht 2re not strung together...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (1): 3–18.
Published: 01 March 1988
... Vzrorum Illustriurn26 But this antic- ipation of events does not necessarily mean that, as the Monk claims, there is “no remedie” for the dreamer’s predicament. The Monk overlooks the possibility of a further turn of Fortune’s wheel. 25 On the Priest’s ironic references to free...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (3): 400–401.
Published: 01 September 1949
... to hold the reins firmly, and to guide the wheels, now to the left, now to the right, avoiding a stone here, or a precipice there. Who can tell whither he is being borne? seeing he hardly remembers whence he has come” (Bohn, 11, 312). -“Lashed as by invisible spirits the sun steeds of time go...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 99–114.
Published: 01 June 1979
... Mercury’s help in stealing the wheels of the sun god’s chariot, but Phoebus promises Salinacis “The heavenly sight of the most beauteous boy” (i.e., Hermaphroditus) if she will help him to get them back. She duly does this, but he still needs to repair them; for this reason, the poet tells us...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 323–336.
Published: 01 December 1962
... and whirlpool, o’er bog and quagmire. . . .” A bog and a ford are part of Browning’s scene. Lear’s “thou art a boil, / a Plague-sore or embossed carbuncle” may well have been remembered in Stanza 26 (“broke into moss or substances like boils while the wheel in Stanza 24 (“that wheel, / Or brake...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (3): 269–297.
Published: 01 September 1997
.... The anticipated delight of full presence becomes, in the next stanza, the meaning of time understood as work: For every grain of sand that runs, And every span of shade that steals, And every kiss of toothed wheels, And all the courses of the suns. (117.9...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (1): 7–16.
Published: 01 March 1950
..., but the German repertory consisted mainly of farces. The actors in the great English religious cycles of York, Chester, and Coventry stood on stages or movable scaffolds, termed “pageants,” wheeled from station to station. A spectator standing at the first sta- tion would see the Creation acted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 95–100.
Published: 01 March 1940
... turbid brick-colored stream” is called Blood River.ls It turns the great water wheel which runs all the machinery in the mill. In the rag-room are “rude, manger-like receptacles running round all its sides; and up to these mangers, like so many mares haltered to the rack, stood...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (2): 167–196.
Published: 01 June 2002
...: / The river glides”; or “how swiftly have they flown, / Succeeding—still succeeding!” or “they wheel away / Yet vanish not. . . . / still they roll”; or “the secret cup / Of still and serious thought went round”; or “moved by choice; or, if constrained in part / Yet still with Nature’s freedom”; or “airs...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (4): 315–320.
Published: 01 December 1960
... turne her wheele no more, As long as life maintaines his mighty arme, That fights for honor to adorne your head. (2156-58) This line of argument, as Voegelin has pointed involves a denial of the possibility of tragedy. Marlowe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 244–254.
Published: 01 September 1958
... of ‘The Secret Agent’ concrete existence. In Chapter I, the fireworks of Stevie’s escapade, “rockets, catherine wheels, detonating squibs,” are revised to “fierce rockets, angry catherine wheels, loudly exploding squibs.” In the same section Winnie receives a “sort of explanation” from Stevie...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (1): 3–19.
Published: 01 March 1987
... or in Latin or Continental writ- ings, find their English expression almost exclusively in alliterative verse. Allusions to Fortune’s Wheel are ubiquitous in Middle Eng- lish, but the only full-fledged portrayals of riders upon the wheel occur in the alliterative Morte Arthure and Soma- Soneday...