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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 172–176.
Published: 01 June 1963
...J. J. Boies Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 THE WHALE WITHOUT EPILOGUE By J. J. BOIES Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick was first published by Richard Bentley in London in a three-volume edition entitled The Whale ( 1851...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 237–244.
Published: 01 September 1963
..., more “organic” allusion is found in Moby-Dick in the philosophical differences symbolized by the right whale’s head and the counterpoised sperm whale’s head. With a sperm whale hoisted on starboard, the Pequod raises a right whale on port : 1 Melville scholarship is endless. The two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (3): 351–355.
Published: 01 September 1949
... languages8 In the Exeter MS, folios 95b-98a,* there are three Old English poems: the Panther, the Whale, the first of 74 lines, the second of 89 lines, and a third poem, of which only 16 lines survive, generally thought to be a description of the partridgeThe whole is known as the Old English...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 159–164.
Published: 01 June 1951
... every traveler of his day, Herman Melville’s Murdi (1849) spreads before the reader’s eyes a remarkable succession of sharks, devilfish, flying fish, blackfish, algerines, killer and thrasher whales (Chapter XIII) , pilot fish, rays, remoras (Chapter XVIII) , swordfish (Chap- ter XXXII...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 125–134.
Published: 01 June 1961
...- counters them, so to speak, with the arrival of every fresh disaster. In Moby Dick, Captain Ahab sets forth with distinctively Emer- sonian expectations. The white whale, as Ahab conceives of it, is simply a visible object, fraught with metaphysical meaning. Under- taking his voyage around...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 181–186.
Published: 01 June 1964
..., as in James or de Maupas- sant? Or is it the magnificent, almost epic, whaling adventure? There can be little question that it is the latter. Throughout most of the book, Melville misses opportunities to dramatize the action, to present the telling gesture or the revealing dialogue, and when he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 325–331.
Published: 01 December 1955
... and Hugh W. Hetherington 33 1 often poetic has been written by an American than Melville’s romance of ‘Moby Dick ; or the Whale.’ ” Typee was “charming . . . but the crown of Melville’s sea experience was the marvelous romance of ‘Moby Dick, the White Whale’. . . . Hawthorne...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 195–206.
Published: 01 June 1940
..., for example, he was capable of referring to “the lofty jet of the whale” as a lethargic influence upon a ship’s crew and of attrib- uting the “alleged savagery” of the South Sea Islanders to European influences-completely unaware, it would seem, that he had just traced the lethargy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 118–127.
Published: 01 June 1956
..., for the opening words of his next book (Moby-Dick) are “Call me Ishmael.” In Moby-Dick the recurrent image, hitherto delectable, becomes a shape of death-a coffin or a whale; but whereas the delectable image threatened death, the threatening image carries life in its belly, Life-in-Death. Immersed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 337–352.
Published: 01 December 1962
... in his vocation,” Starbuck will accept it with practical courage. Melville adds the examples of “need- less peril” appropriate to the vocation of whaling; and as he does SO, he again slips into Fuller’s manner: “For . . . I am here in this criti- cal ocean to kill whales for my living...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 445–452.
Published: 01 December 1946
... the material at our disposal. Garsecg is very well attested in OE literature. It occurs in the fol- lowing poetical works : Beowulf, Genesis, Exodus, PhEnix, Metra, Psalms, Whale, Riddles, Runic Poem, Order of the World (=Won- ders of Crsation).2 Its use implies no particular difficulties. It often...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 317–324.
Published: 01 September 1950
... of Negro characters as people. The only Negro in the book who betrays any kind of neurosis is young Pip, who shrinks from Iife after a nightmare experience in chasing a whale. Melville significantly refers to him as “Poor Alabama boy The other people of color in the book, except Old Fleece, have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 300–302.
Published: 01 September 1982
...- vinced while one reads that Pierre Glendinning’s probIem really is that he is lost in “a labyrinth of semantic madness” (p. 168) and that Mob Dick “is an investigation of the countless verbal and symbolic representations of the great white whale, and the different philosophical ‘grammars...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 302–304.
Published: 01 September 1982
... Glendinning’s probIem really is that he is lost in “a labyrinth of semantic madness” (p. 168) and that Mob Dick “is an investigation of the countless verbal and symbolic representations of the great white whale, and the different philosophical ‘grammars’ the members of the Pequod’s crew use...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (2): 167–193.
Published: 01 June 2019
..., “Richard Owen told me in London” of a visit paid him by J. M. W. Turner. The preeminent English painter had wanted the preeminent English anatomist “to give him the history of the mollusk on which the whale fed,” Turner “wishing to understand the whale ab ovo thoroughly, because he was going to paint...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 242–243.
Published: 01 June 1943
... refer it. Incidentally, “It was the copy of our confer- ence” (C. of E., V, 1, 62) is far from alluding to “Original, manu- script, theme, etc.” It is merely the Latin copia Anglicized, referring to that “plenty of words and matters” which was “whaled” into little boys in grammar school...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 218–219.
Published: 01 June 1952
... be, one does not have to. be a dogmatist to assert with assurance their quite measurable inferiority to Melville’s titanic, if flawed, masterpiece on the Whale. HARRYH. BURNS Unizwsity of Washington ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 255–258.
Published: 01 June 2003
... respect, however, the book could have been expanded: Spark’s envisagement of Ahab as an intellectual hero depends on the proposition, in need of qualification, that the “whale hunt was not what it seemed” (311). In phraseology quick to bypass the gore and violence of the actual hunt, Ahab’s “harpoon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 258–260.
Published: 01 June 2003
... respect, however, the book could have been expanded: Spark’s envisagement of Ahab as an intellectual hero depends on the proposition, in need of qualification, that the “whale hunt was not what it seemed” (311). In phraseology quick to bypass the gore and violence of the actual hunt, Ahab’s “harpoon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 260–265.
Published: 01 June 2003
... respect, however, the book could have been expanded: Spark’s envisagement of Ahab as an intellectual hero depends on the proposition, in need of qualification, that the “whale hunt was not what it seemed” (311). In phraseology quick to bypass the gore and violence of the actual hunt, Ahab’s “harpoon...