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vowel

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
... one) of sound change. This is above all the case when, in the pro- duction of a particular vowel or diphthong, two organs are concerned, and one is active at the front of the mouth while the other is active at the back of it. Concentration results here in the process of fronting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
... the general phonetic description of their principal allophones :? VOWELS: front (unrounded) central (unrounded) back (rounded) high 1: 1 u: u mid e: e 0: 0 low a a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
... conventional [ ts] for the affricate which Reed indicates by [c]. (7) Reed uses the Greek eta /v/ to designate both the velar nasal and mere nasalization of vowels. This is possible in the dialect he describes inasmuch as the velar nasal appears only after short vowels, while only long vowels...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1952) 13 (4): 416–417.
Published: 01 December 1952
... qualitative sub-members of the cardinal vowels do not occur in German. The short vowel of Engl. ‘up’ [ap], ‘hut’ [bt] is an [a] sound, while u in S.E. ‘man’ [maen], though often classed as a sub-member of [a], is more correctly an independent sound between [a] and [el, as the ligature serves to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1952) 13 (4): 417–418.
Published: 01 December 1952
... vowels do not occur in German. The short vowel of Engl. ‘up’ [ap], ‘hut’ [bt] is an [a] sound, while u in S.E. ‘man’ [maen], though often classed as a sub-member of [a], is more correctly an independent sound between [a] and [el, as the ligature serves to suggest. (P. 71) The first two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1942) 3 (1): 5–8.
Published: 01 March 1942
... or normal syllable made up of vowel and consonant.* This interpretation often agrees with the facts of usage. Thus, the word national may be pronounced with or without a vowel in either or both of its last two syllables. In words like beaten, however, the vowel of the weak syllable is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1963) 24 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1963
... preceded by the chief stress” (p. 153, and similarly on p. 155). In this connection, the words frost and frozen (p. 103) illustrate almost nothing, and the pairs was-were/lose-fwlorn might have sereved better as ex- amples than frore (p. 155). Concerning the Middle English vowel system...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1945) 6 (4): 495–496.
Published: 01 December 1945
... pronunciation of vowels, the author’s remarks on the nature and length of vowel denoted by the letter e in the past participle of class one are confusing; for example, e is considered to be a variant for short i in betyn (p. 7), to represent a lengthened vowel in strekyiz (p. 25), to be a symbol for...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1941) 2 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1941
... used connote very definite ideas. On p. 8, the author enters upon a discussion of the Latin sound of c before a front vowel, and asserts that its sound was k. That may give rise to unprofitable controversy, and some will probably always remain doubtful of any conclusion. Would it not...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1942) 3 (3): 472–475.
Published: 01 September 1942
..., as is now generally done, Hoops defends the orthodox Shakespeare. On the basis of the variant spellings Hoops concludes that Shakespeare probably pro- nounced his name in two ways: with a short vowel in colloquial speech, and with a long vowel in formal speech. It seems rather...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1941) 2 (3): 522–524.
Published: 01 September 1941
... the formula for phonetic change is exactly the same in the case of consonants and vowels, including the process of diph- thongization. This formula may be stated as follows : When the urge toward conservation of energy threatens, by means of the process of as- similation, to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1946) 7 (1): 21–33.
Published: 01 March 1946
... four to twelve verses. A few translations there are that show some dissatisfaction with the rime schemes of English balladry for the interpretation of the characteristic vowel rime of the Spanish ballads. The Defeat of Don Roderick (George Moir, Edinburgh Review, [January, 18241 ) re...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1940) 1 (2): 266–267.
Published: 01 June 1940
... experimenters found that “quantitative variation in a stressed vowel due to a change in phonetic environment is . . . the same in vowels of different quali- ty,” they based their results on analysis of 68 records of tooten [tutan] and 55 records of tooty [tut The Results: Stress level...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 372–374.
Published: 01 September 1943
... results are presented in four chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. The Vowel Sounds of Stressed Syllables. 3. The Vowel Sounds of Unstressed and Partially Stressed Syllables. 4. The Consonants. Mr. Hall is careful not to present his findings as a complete and exhaustive record, yet it is difficult...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 96–98.
Published: 01 March 1943
... consonants and “light” and “dark” as applied to vowels. In the table of illustrations for the various vowel sounds (p. 56), the German words Strune, uber, schon are transcribed as if with a short vowel, whereas in the Standard German they have a long vowel. In the discussion of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1950) 11 (1): 124–125.
Published: 01 March 1950
... counter to the free development of natural speech. Professor Hall has too good an ear and at the same time too much respect for the school- masters to perform with complete satisfaction to anybody the task he has set for himself. For instance, he recognizes, at last, the vowel of F. main as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1951) 12 (2): 243–244.
Published: 01 June 1951
... monosyllabic pronuncia- tion); and I would recognize elision of the weak -e in mahte before the following vowel, thus avoiding a two-syllable Senkung with hiatus: %it unde bter rnii’htq enstl‘n.” Instead of a reading with “Hebung pausiert”: “nu h6lz ,, nu hbidh” (p. 52), why not: “nd h6k, nu heid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 113–114.
Published: 01 March 1943
... to indicate the sounding of final -e before a vowel-beginning word, or, vice versa, the silenc- ing of the -e before a consonant. These exceptions have been care- fully set forth in the systematically arranged “Demonstration” which constitutes the major part of this book, and are...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 377–378.
Published: 01 September 1946
... for example r, with which one has long been familiar as indicating the vocalic us;of the liquid, is here employed for the extreme opposite, the voiceless consonant. One also notes that j, described as a spirant (p. 15), is equated with the English y, which is a semi-vowel. From the point...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 32–36.
Published: 01 March 1961
... more tenuous than the one we have discussed but more pervasive-are sug- gested by the casual sound effects of the airs. Mrs. Catherine Ing has demonstrated that Campion in his quantitative experiments frequently used repeated vowel sounds in order to force the identical length of different...