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veil

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 190–191.
Published: 01 June 1972
...A. C. Hamilton Michael Murrin. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1969. x + 224 pp. $8.75. Copyright © 1972 by Duke University Press 1972 1 YO REVIEWS The Veil of Allegory: Some Notes Toward a Theory...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (3): 303–305.
Published: 01 September 1978
...A. C. HAMILTON O'CONNELL MICHAEL. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1977. xiii + 220 pp. $14.95. Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 REVIEWS Mirror and Veil: The Historical Dimension of Spenser’s “Faerie Queene...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 321–341.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Gary Handwerk Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 BEHIND SYBIL‘S VEIL DISRAELI’S MIX OF IDEOLOGICAL MESSAGES By GARY HANDWERK The status accorded Benjamin Disraeli’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 47–67.
Published: 01 March 1976
... discovers a principle of spiritual truth. This is the truth of the “lucid veil” (67.14), the truth that the sacramental breeze and flowers of section 95 are an adjective of spirit, hiding the face of God even as they reveal his Anatomy of Criticism (Princeton, 1957), p. 308: “The confession...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 191–195.
Published: 01 June 1972
... of his own approach to the poem to be courteous to others. Moreover, he writes lucidly: though he defends allegor- ical rhetoric, he does not impose a veil to hide truth from all but the initiate to his approach, as others have done, but like the rhetorical critic, whom he opposes, he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (2): 150–159.
Published: 01 June 1962
...” in lines 47-48, “Winds of remembering / Of the ancient being blow,” and line 51, “Pour, Bac- chus! the remembering wine.” In “Bacchus” the poet wishes to re- move or penetrate “the angels’ veiling wings,” to rediscover to human sight man’s lost knowledge, the lost Pleiad, to cause a blush to tinge...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 291–296.
Published: 01 December 1962
... of mankind under the Old Law to a night, the darkness is not absolute as before. True, the veil of clouds that ushers in the night has been drawn across the heavens to inter- vene between God’s light and the earth, and this veil is to be associated with the Old Law. Yet there is a “weake Shine...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (2): 269–278.
Published: 01 June 1996
... to af€ect public figures and institutions, there is no solution but to lift the veil, turn one’s head toward the crime, and crack the whip that will later stop the reproduc- tion of these and other depressing scandals.19 “Lift the veil”; expose the most scandalous details...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (4): 371–387.
Published: 01 December 1966
... had expected the fiery destruction of God’s day of judgment and found instead the “healing wings” of grace, God’s veiled “Moon.” The images of the next two stanzas emphasize other unexpected aspects of Nicodemus’ confrontation with the “Sun” at “mid-night.” In a “dead and silent hour...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 123–131.
Published: 01 June 1977
... of the satyrs, Una had had the veil snatched from her face; thus in this episode, for the first time in sense . . . both better than and inferior to man” (The Poetry of “The Faerie Queene” [Prince- ton, 19671, p. 29). Although this is not an exhaustive listing of modern reading, it is repre...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 449–452.
Published: 01 December 1944
... : . . . The wind outblows Her scarf into a fluttering pavillion. So far as I can judge from an examination of concordances and dictionaries of quotations, the simile here employed is unique in English poetry. I find no other case in which a scarf, veil, or mantle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (3): 270–284.
Published: 01 September 1966
..., seeming!” This is a motto for Measure for Measure. The truth in this comedy of hoods and veils lies beneath surface appearances, as Isabella must learn. Her lesson is ours as well. The surface of the play is deceptive. At Act 111, Scene i, line 152 (the Duke’s “Vouchsafe a word . . the plot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (1): 98–104.
Published: 01 March 1950
... are concerned chiefly with her theory. The question of style was one which often perplexed Doiia Emilia. Sometimes a very polished and correct style may place a veil between the reader and the work-perhaps a golden veil, but nevertheless a veil. If the other extreme is taken, the author...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (1): 76–79.
Published: 01 March 1989
... is a characteristic moment, from the end of his reading of “Mariana,” with allusive glances elsewhere: “Tennyson’s lordly music and deep pulsationsjoined him not to nature or any mortal presence natural or human, but to a power felt from behind the veil” (p. 77). Apt enough. Nonetheless, a criticism less...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (3): 306–309.
Published: 01 September 1977
... darkness is part of its “reflection of dark, labyrinthine fallen experience” (p. 60) even though she allows later that “the veil of a dark conceit is in fact no veil at all, but revelation” (p. 220). On syn- thetic allegory, she finds Spenser more syncretistic than his Protestantism would allow...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (1): 19–42.
Published: 01 March 2001
...- wardly confined in their armor. In contrast, Saladin combines ele- ments of both genders: he wears not only the sword of the fighting man but also the jewels and veils of a woman. He can not only fight but play: Richard depends on his troubadour for amusement, but Saladin...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (4): 461–473.
Published: 01 December 1970
... reached a level of human consciousness and experience on which they fail to grasp the deeper meaning of the stories. Indeed, his brothers still have a tendency to revert to primitive emotions (“Urgeblok as Dinah’s story and the events that culminate in the “rending” of Joseph’s veil clearly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 1994
..., The Lucid Veil, and Victorians and Mystery . Elegy and Theory: Is Historical and Critical Knowledge Possible? W. David Shaw iterary historians tend to claim either too little knowledge of the Lpast or too much. They may write useful factual chronicles, but what they narrate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 683–686.
Published: 01 December 2000
...”: Within Jim Crow America’s color line, within the “Veil of Race,” black people are judged by their skins and not by their souls; their souls of- ten grow “choked and deformed.” . . . But “above the Veil,” in the “king- dom of culture,” souls walk...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (4): 686–689.
Published: 01 December 2000
...”: Within Jim Crow America’s color line, within the “Veil of Race,” black people are judged by their skins and not by their souls; their souls of- ten grow “choked and deformed.” . . . But “above the Veil,” in the “king- dom of culture,” souls walk...