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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1980) 41 (3): 248–267.
Published: 01 September 1980
...Howard D. Weinbrot Copyright © 1980 by Duke University Press 1980 NO “MOCK DEBATE” QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS IN THE VANITY OF HUMAN WISHES By HOWARDD. WEINBROT “They who are demanded by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1982) 43 (1): 43–66.
Published: 01 March 1982
...Stephen Canham Copyright © 1982 by Duke University Press 1982 ART AND THE ILLUSTRATIONS OF VANITY FAIR AND THE NEWCOMES By STEPHENCANHAM Since William Makepeace Thackeray was the sole major Victorian novelist to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1974) 35 (1): 16–29.
Published: 01 March 1974
...George T. Amis Copyright © 1974 by Duke University Press 1974 THE STYLE OF THE VANITY OF HUMAN WISHES By GEORGET. AMIS The Vanity of Human Wishes is a poem of great power, but it has never been immediately obvious why this should be the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1941) 2 (2): 163–178.
Published: 01 June 1941
...John W. Dodds Copyright © 1941 by Duke University Press 1941 THACKERAY AS A SATIRIST PREVIOUS TO VANITY FAIR By JOHN W. DODDS To one interested in tracing the growth of Thackeray’s mind and art the years before Vanity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2010) 71 (3): 229–269.
Published: 01 September 2010
... ladder of Creation. The vision of “things invisible to mortal sight” that the poet asks for in the opening invocation is analogized, in the divine council that the book goes on to depict, to the Son's faith in his triumph over death. False analogy leads the fools of the Limbo of Vanity to understand God...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1965) 26 (2): 347–349.
Published: 01 June 1965
... of Thackeray is without doubt an illuminating contribution to novel criticism. It is a convincing demonstration of the importance of a close reading of words, and the resulting interpretations of Vanity Fair and Henry Esmond are expert and imaginative. To present even a part of a great...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1977) 38 (1): 102–104.
Published: 01 March 1977
... is not. The book begins with a procrustean attempt to fit Vanity Fair into the categories for fiction supplied by Sheldon Sacks in Fiction and the Shape of Belief. Kawlins finds that Vanity Fair incorporates romantic drama, apo- logue, and satire. For this he seems to blame Thackeray...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1947) 8 (1): 53–64.
Published: 01 March 1947
...Wallace Cable Brown Copyright © 1945 by Duke University Press 1947 JOHNSON AS POET By WALLACECABLE BROWN Samuel Johnson the poet is familiar to students of literature as the author of one poem; but even “Th,e Vanity of Human Wishes” is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1965) 26 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1965
...: Princeton University Press, 1964. vi + 236 pp. $5.00. This new book on the art of Thackeray is without doubt an illuminating contribution to novel criticism. It is a convincing demonstration of the importance of a close reading of words, and the resulting interpretations of Vanity Fair and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1942) 3 (1): 139.
Published: 01 March 1942
... of the entries about the great are on the level of “Still reading Vanity Fair,” or “Heard Bulwer speak, he being in the chair.” Mr. Haight has edited the diaries with indefatigable and impeccable scholarship. Multi- tudes of footnotes identify scores of unknowns...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1977) 38 (1): 100–102.
Published: 01 March 1977
... Thackeray to be something that he is not. The book begins with a procrustean attempt to fit Vanity Fair into the categories for fiction supplied by Sheldon Sacks in Fiction and the Shape of Belief. Kawlins finds that Vanity Fair incorporates romantic drama, apo- logue, and satire. For this he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1951) 12 (3): 375.
Published: 01 September 1951
... most stimulating study attempts to fathom the integral form of the Victorian novel which embraces a variety of utmost contrasts, such as David Copperfield, Vanity Fair, Wuthering Heights, etc. The author suggests that the Victorian novel did not entirely face up to the threat of tragedy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1973) 34 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 1973
...- eray’s intrusions make for a complex structural integrity, and devotes her first chapter, on Vanity Fair, to showing how. The argument is subtle and takes as its premise: “The passages of commentary are not directives on what to think” (p. 11). Now presumably, although it is not mentioned...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1956) 17 (3): 275–276.
Published: 01 September 1956
..., common decency, manliness, and candor-were, when extricated from their outmoded fripperies, as valid as ever. These ideals lie expounded for a growing middle-class in The Book of Snobs and Vanity Fair. It is not surprising, there- fore, that G. M. Young has spoken of Thackeray as “with...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1958) 19 (2): 141–146.
Published: 01 June 1958
... write about was a world not inspiriting but certainly mundane. So, he avers, of Vanity Fair, this subject “We might have treated.. . in the genteel, or in the romantic, or in the facetious manner. Suppose we had laid the scene in Grosvenor Square,” as Disraeli or Bulwer-Lytton would have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1968) 29 (3): 358–360.
Published: 01 September 1968
... the treatment of vanity in Sermon XI1 differs from that in “The Vanity of Human Wishes,” the reason seems obvious enough: in the poem, based on Juvenal, Johnson sometimes paraphrases his source; in the sermon, preached on a text from Ecclesiastes, he retains much of the spirit of that famous...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1948) 9 (2): 248–249.
Published: 01 June 1948
... them for their own, but the average reader, whose education has included the reading of Vanity Fair, will find in the Letters endless delight. He will find an array of unique personalities revealed with a frank insight that is always both charming and exciting. He will be involved in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1948) 9 (2): 249–250.
Published: 01 June 1948
... work. There is another aspect of these four volumes that should not be neglected in a review. The scholars may claim them for their own, but the average reader, whose education has included the reading of Vanity Fair, will find in the Letters endless delight. He will find an array...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1944) 5 (1): 89–91.
Published: 01 March 1944
... wisdom. Ostentation and vain-glory have induced thee to display thy imag- ined superiority of parts: thy vanity pretends to pervade all systems of religion, and thy heart’s conceit will approve of none. . . . Thy studies tend only to alienate the minds of men from any settled form of worship...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 441–443.
Published: 01 December 1986
... cards, which is not very polite” (p. 157). “Pope shows us that Belinda’s vanity is wounded by the haircut, but we are not shown that she has any self- awareness or self-judgment” (p. 163). Messenger apparently assumes that Pope has tried but failed to offer a realistic verbal portrait of a...