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tuscan

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 109–110.
Published: 01 March 1943
... years, and the reasons for its final solution. The questione della lingua had its inception in Dante’s De vul- gari eloquentia and its severe condemnation of the Tuscan dialect. Dante, then, in search of a noble literary language, concludes that such a language does exist, not in any...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 373–382.
Published: 01 December 1962
.... They varied in importance and character according to the pre- vailing political and social conditions of the day. At a time when other Italian dialects were yielding to Tuscan, which in spite of the famous quarrel was steadily developing into the national language of Italy, Provenqal was...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1965) 26 (4): 611–612.
Published: 01 December 1965
.... Panuccio 67. middle of thirteenth century) was one of the earliest Tuscan poets from a school, the Pisan, whose limited renown is matched by the scantiness of its production. Panuccio’s poems, twenty-two in all, are extant in two manuscripts only, eighteen in one, four in the other. Most of them...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 291–292.
Published: 01 September 1943
.... 29 1 292 Milton and Harington was, that he had rather be one of the principal1 and chiefe Tuscan writers, then scarse the second or third among the Latines . . . (pp. 416-417). The similarities are obvious: the desire to enrich their own languages, the Bembo-Ariosto...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1959) 20 (1): 106–107.
Published: 01 March 1959
... Tuscans, who seem to have brought that locution to Rome. If the authors wish to dispute any of these remarks, it will only prove what linguists well know: that a dialect changes from decade to decade, from rione to rione, and even from person to person...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1964) 25 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 March 1964
... repertoire of stories about conjugal infidelity and young women compelled to enter religion. But he was witty and to the point without tolerating the marinistic type of concetti. His principal source of inspiration was Lucian’s Dialogues. He wrote in good Tuscan and told much about himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1951) 12 (4): 473–486.
Published: 01 December 1951
... lire in all. The earlier feeling of hostility, perhaps entirely due to Galileo’s impecuniosity, was now replaced by a warmer relationship. In a letter to the court tutor of the heir to the Tuscan throne, Landucci reported the news of Galileo’s return to Padua from Florence in the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1959) 20 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 1959
... Marte, nun se sposa, nun se parte, nun se mette muno a l’arte I have heard with the variant nun se dd principio a Parte. Gioielli for “beans” is used, but only in derisive imitation of Tuscans, who seem to have brought that locution to Rome. If the authors wish to dispute any of these...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1958) 19 (1): 43–46.
Published: 01 March 1958
... Tuscan. His specific purpose is to make fun of some poets of the past who attained Par- nassus without deserving it. This Neapolitan Viqgio is often humor- ous, burlesque, and satiric; but Cortese, as early as Canto I, could become truly serious and give forth what constitutes the aesthetics...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 129–131.
Published: 01 March 1941
.... The order in which the dialects are treated is unique. The Tus- can are first treated, probably because they are closest to the “lit- erary Italian,” but the dialects of Umbria and Latium, instead of being classified with the Tuscan, are put into a third group of Central and Southern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2012) 73 (2): 175–199.
Published: 01 June 2012
... one used in Purgatory by the Tuscan poet Guido Guinizzelli to introduce Arnaut himself as the “miglior fabbro del parlar materno” that is, the “better craftsman of the mother tongue.” “Il Miglior Fabbro” is also the title of the chapter that Pound...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1972) 33 (4): 355–369.
Published: 01 December 1972
... hands of Satan-may, in fact, be virtuous if it tends to “glorifie / The great Work-Maister,” evil if it does the opp~site.~Satan, overhearing As Stanley Fish puts it, “the Tuscan artist’s glass represents the furthest extension of 358 PARADISE...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1946) 7 (1): 65–81.
Published: 01 March 1946
... offices of Josiah Wedgwood who, from England, sent him an invita- tion and a cheque, lie was brought over there to help in ministering to the rapidly growing appetite for Italian culture, as “preceptor of the Tuscan language” and “to enjoy [to use his own words] the happi- ness of living in this...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1964) 25 (1): 122–127.
Published: 01 March 1964
... with a repertoire of stories about conjugal infidelity and young women compelled to enter religion. But he was witty and to the point without tolerating the marinistic type of concetti. His principal source of inspiration was Lucian’s Dialogues. He wrote in good Tuscan and told much about...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1983) 44 (4): 374–393.
Published: 01 December 1983
... in De Vulgari Eloquentia. In “Arnaut Daniel” (1920) he says that “we should see clearly enough in Dante’s treatise when he uses such words as pexa, hirsuta, lubrica . . . to put his words into categories, that he is thinking exactlyoand his criticism of Provencal and Tuscan poetry is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1990) 51 (2): 167–184.
Published: 01 June 1990
... analysis of Cicero’s orations that exposed their mechanics and enabled students to imitate them intelligently. Uncharacteristic of his later prejudice for writing in Latin, Loschi already by 1392 had done a Tuscan translation of portions of the Declamationes XIX maiores ascribed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1964) 25 (3): 272–294.
Published: 01 September 1964
... manly sphere of action, must send forth his young lords to the Tuscan wars to achieve the honor-“see that you come / Not to woo honour, but to wed it” (II.i.14-15)-which he himself can no longer aspire to. Disenabled of the active pursuit of honor, age nevertheless has the security of already...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1947) 8 (4): 408–418.
Published: 01 December 1947
... recorded any pronounced reaction to the Revolution as did Alfieri, who died some nine years earlier. He mingled in politics scarcely at all; went once on an embassy to Napoleon;2 and did some work as a public servant under the Tuscan royal government. But he confined himself mainly to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1961) 22 (4): 357–366.
Published: 01 December 1961
... gli amanti Privi ognora di sonna a1 mezzo giorno Appunto risvegliavansi. . . .15 Anticipating the printing of Conti’s version by one year, Andrea Bonducci published his translation “in Tuscan verse” in 1739. A sec- ond edition followed at Naples in 1760. The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1990) 51 (2): 105–121.
Published: 01 June 1990
... urban oligarchies, for the servitors it won honors and employment. In sixteenth-cen- tury England, as a feature in the so-called educational revolution Cited by Charles de La Roncikre, “Tuscan Notables on the Eve of the Renaissance,” in Georges D;by, ed., A Hzsto?y of Private I& 3 vols...