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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2012) 73 (2): 175–199.
Published: 01 June 2012
..., Gavin Douglas, and the Vulgar Tongue Daniel Katz s Ezra Pound was fond of pointing out, the troubadour poet AArnaut Daniel enjoys a singular privilege in The Divine Comedy: he is the only shade whom Dante allows to speak in his native language. As Pound commented in “The subtlest...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1950) 11 (3): 361–362.
Published: 01 September 1950
.... CLOTILDEWILSON UniverJity of Washington The Sources of “A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues,” by Randle Cotgrave (London, 1611) : A Study in Renaissance Lexicography. By VERA E. SMALLEY.Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins Studies in Romance Literatures and Languages, Extra...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2017) 78 (4): 465–489.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Bernardes’s reputation as brando (gentle), as he was said to demonstrate the brandura of their mother tongue. Yet later in the seventeenth century his fortunes sank. Though he is little esteemed today, his association with the multiple meanings of brando and brandura implicated him in important political...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
.... Thus, in early Old French, the Vulgar Latin open o (Q), under the accent in an open syllable, breaks to the diphthong t&. This shows for the 14 high back position of the tongue and for the a mid back position, while rounding of the lips or labialisation occurs for both. It is obvious...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1950) 11 (3): 361.
Published: 01 September 1950
... UniverJity of Washington The Sources of “A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues,” by Randle Cotgrave (London, 1611) : A Study in Renaissance Lexicography. By VERA E. SMALLEY.Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins Studies in Romance Literatures and Languages, Extra Volume XXV, 1948. Pp...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2003) 64 (2): 169–179.
Published: 01 June 2003
... earlier Spenser’s friend E. K. had complained “that our mother tongue, which truly of itself is both full enough for prose and stately enough for verse, hath long time been counted most bare and barren of both,” a complaint directed still more specifically at poetry by E. K.’s follower William Webbe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1978) 39 (1): 78–79.
Published: 01 March 1978
... declaration of her life in order that she can be rocked to sleep in the same “dear cradle” and sung to death by the same “sweet tongue” that took away her Camille. (p. 61) Sentimentality of this sort is the last refuge of those desperately in search of something to say about a literary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 291–292.
Published: 01 September 1943
... all the industry and art I could unite to the adorning of my native tongue. . . .4 In an essay, The Life of Ariosto . . ., in Sir John Harington’s Orlando Furioso in English Heroical Verse (London, 16%) ,6 Sir John observes [Ariosto] determined, as it should seeme, to make...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 109–110.
Published: 01 March 1943
... one of the local dialects of Italy, but over and above all of them, in elements (primarily of vocabulary) common to all the dialects. He uses what he considers to be such a language in his Cornmedia, and Boccaccio and Petrarch use a similar tongue. For a century after Dante’s death...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1954) 15 (2): 191.
Published: 01 June 1954
... collector liked the originals well enough to try his hand (and what a skillful hand!) at a translation, and to share with us the pleasure of having incorporated some forty German poems into his mother tongue. If further proof had been needed (although, most emphatically, it was not...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1983) 44 (1): 39–50.
Published: 01 March 1983
... images evil as “double-mindedness” (Pss. 12:2, 119: 113; Jer. 9:5-8), while the forked tongue or sharp- edged (cutting, splitting) tongue is the dominant metaphor for false or deceitful utterance (Pss. 52:2, 57:4, 140:3). Similarly, the inability to speak one’s thought because of disunity in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 167–177.
Published: 01 June 1977
..., persevering in its own course “untempted by the fashionable quays.” In some remote world, “far” from Yeats’s illness, far from cities, primitive forms of life continue. And in this paragraph occur the section’s only positive lines about Yeats’s poetry: “By mourning tongues / The death of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 373–382.
Published: 01 December 1962
... rapidly spreading in the provinces. To some extent this renewed interest in the mother tongue can be explained by the fact that it was a tongue with a rich literary past, and one spoken over an area covering more than a third of France. Some scholars maintain that the Provensal revival was...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1991) 52 (3): 225–261.
Published: 01 September 1991
...Patricia Parker Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 THE MERRY WVES OF WNDSORAND SHAKESPEARFAN TRANSLATION By PATRICIAPARKER LOCAL HUWISM: USSONS, PAGES, TONGUES Some years ago, in the course of a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 3–11.
Published: 01 March 1961
... every praise; 0 valiantly support the tongue you love, And don’t desert Gaelic, now or for ever.12 With this verse compare, for instance, the equally impassioned song in praise of Roumanian-another tongue threatened by engulfment : Sweet and soft the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 207–218.
Published: 01 June 1944
.... The Language As is well known, the founders of the FClibrige were enthusiastic young men who vowed to work relentlessly for the restoration of what they called the “primitive purity” and dignity of their mother- tongue. Such was their initial and most important aim; and this suggests why...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1971) 32 (1): 119–122.
Published: 01 March 1971
... enjoys puncturing the myth of his in• fallibility. Kern can then speak of "an analogymonger like me," remember• ing Beckett's context and enjoying the small irony. Her tongue-in-cheek tone is precisely right for a book which deals with such accomplished ironists as Kierkegaard and Beckett...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1975) 36 (1): 91–93.
Published: 01 March 1975
... the very end of the nineteenth century, having been re- ferred to first as Yidish-daylsh (“Judaeo-German”) and then (more infa- mously) as Zhargon (“jargon Yiddish, it was alleged by Westernized en- lighteners, was not merely inferior to the holy tongue (Hebrew) but intrinsi- cally ugly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1944) 5 (4): 490–491.
Published: 01 December 1944
... the spoken tongue, and that for the course of a century or so the written system remains unduly conservative while the spoken progresses faster. A scribe, then, who was fully aware of the case system might correct a text before him in an archaizing way, even though in daily conversation he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1942) 3 (3): 449–455.
Published: 01 September 1942
...]. Regarding the latter, even the Deutscher Sprachutlas does not help us2 Two theories prevail regarding the origin of uvular [R] in Ger- man. Otto Jespersen contends that it is a purely phonetic phe- nomenon which developed [rixR] because of the fact that not only the tip of the tongue...