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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 80–81.
Published: 01 March 1972
... WOLFGANG LEINEK 81 the reader may attain a balanced view of Mine de Clhes’s moral responsibil- ity, it perspective without which a full appreciation of the novel as it whole is impossible. Among tlie different chapters in this work, the one...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 69–72.
Published: 01 March 1972
...- polytall’itania-legitimate realizations of Shakespeare’s text? Or does tlie sheer self-conficlent thrust of this production, aided by the s~perb clarity of‘ the dialogue, only disguise the radical liberties the director is taking with his text? Granted tliat, as one recent comnientaior...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1976) 37 (4): 390–391.
Published: 01 December 1976
... with the poems and on Sckve’s relationship to tlie three traditions-biblical, class i cii 1, ii n d 1’ e tr a rcli an-ii n der 1y i n g tlie cl i zii i ns . 0n t h i s secon ct q lies t i on , we are told very cai-ly that “a greater affinity between Sckve and tlic Komxn love poets than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 432–434.
Published: 01 December 1974
...,” May concludes, “is tlie encounter of the inten- sively conscious human being with his world” (quoted in Stambolian, pp. 4-5). Stambolian rightly senses that May could well be describing Proust’s moments bienheureux, of which the macleleine episode is the most famous. Hut., one objects...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 86–88.
Published: 01 March 1972
... major romantic poems not to be overtly political compli- cates Woodring’s task, demanding niore elaborate exposition than lie has al- lowed himself? One wishes to assent to tlie whole of Woodring’s book, not just to liis claims for tlie political impulse in romantic poetry, but also to his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1975) 36 (2): 209–213.
Published: 01 June 1975
... arl>itrarily emphasizes tliliitinan rather than Emerson, say, and blurs tlie most useful and instriictive thing al~outany treatment of either poet: those essential differences between them which are ;~l)solirtelybasic to an understanding of their art. We finally want to I>etold...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1940) 1 (4): 565–566.
Published: 01 December 1940
... baclqyound of the times and to niake clear tlie enduring values of tlie passing literary move- ments and men. In reading Bithell the disquieting feeling persists that the fascinating pieces of a jig-saw puzzle are presented but not put together to reveal thc whole picture. Rlany tiresome...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1971) 32 (3): 331–333.
Published: 01 September 1971
...” (“Seine Kintlliei t war tlie Jiigencl der Steine / iind sein Alter ist nicht tlas seine”) emphasizes more the timelessness of the artist than the itlea ot’ the “chiltlhootl spontaneity out ot’ which the self-formecl artist grows” (11. 205). One weakness of the book is the rather perfunctory i...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 81–83.
Published: 01 March 1972
... responsibil- ity, it perspective without which a full appreciation of the novel as it whole is impossible. Among tlie different chapters in this work, the one entitled “Baroque or Classic?” fits least well into tlie over-all design of the study. The reader gets the impression that the author...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1973) 34 (4): 470–473.
Published: 01 December 1973
... IAN RON AI.1) PAU IASON 47 1 of’ the historical figure and the great epic poem, as also between tlie epic Iiero arid the epic poem. Swift summed it up: “It is Homer and Virgil we rever- ence and admire, not Achilles and Aenetis.” I, for...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1970) 31 (2): 252–260.
Published: 01 June 1970
... to “tic” is ii conscious. scprxte xt. 254 REV I EWS and “rciiiiiiiiit” is ;I delibcratcly sclf-conscious word. Similarly, if to “smell my remnant out” suggests passing the rest of his life savoring tlie flowers, he is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 434–436.
Published: 01 December 1974
...Egon Schwarz Richard Jayne. Frankfurt am Main: Athenäum, Literatur und Reflexion, 9, 1972. viii + 252 pp. Copyright © 1974 by Duke University Press 1974 4 34 I< EV 1 E ws definition of tlie ideal reader (one who “must seek...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1956) 17 (3): 274.
Published: 01 September 1956
... shows that this statement is morc than just a part of Swift’s pseudo-pessimism which so often has been mistakenly accepted at face value, that it is actually n considered evaluation of the state of tlie Church of Ireland. The first two chapters of the hook are biographical, dealing with...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1956) 17 (3): 278.
Published: 01 September 1956
... book is ow of the best examples of what we have come to expect of text editions from Britain. Professor Powell’s judicious statemrnts and his clear styte tend to conceal thr wide scope of his scholarship, which is made evident by the footiiotcs and tlie list of works consulted. Them is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1971) 32 (3): 330–331.
Published: 01 September 1971
... hinausschaut in dieser Nacht” the idea of the “second hand” is rather gratuitously applied to the works, instead of being derived from them. JUDITH RYAN 33 1 Similarly, the I-etei-ence to chi1dhood in “Kodin” (“Seine Kintlliei t war tlie...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1967) 28 (1): 102–103.
Published: 01 March 1967
... because tlie poet appears almost out of nowhere; except for his plots, no antecedent, c;in l>e shown. Conventional stylistic studies-philological ones in i hc hi o:tcle1 sense-yield little, again because of the poet’s originality; once the 1lie torical devices have been pointed out, the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1973) 34 (4): 436–447.
Published: 01 December 1973
... when his heedless frui t-gatherers tranipled the grain ;iround tlie trees; they had to smother their anger when his liiiiitiii~-i~~irties gilloped through their fields laying waste the result of‘ their patient toil; they were not allowed to keep doves tlieniselves, and when the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 72–75.
Published: 01 March 1972
...Hallett Smith Russell Fraser. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1970. 215 pp. $7.50. Copyright © 1972 by Duke University Press 1972 72 REVIEWS bear on tlie effects of Shakespeare’s juxtapositions of scenes, so crucial...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1967) 28 (1): 117–121.
Published: 01 March 1967
..., lmt and ino5t cliai acteristic novels he was not the picturesque celebrator of knight5 arid fair ladies, but tlie troubled observer of the paradoxes involved in relating ti ntlitioii to piogress. Later, I applied this theory in considerable detail, to Thc. lienit 01 Midlothian and then...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1956) 17 (4): 366–367.
Published: 01 December 1956
...” about the nature of tragedy. It pleases Professor Stirling to enjoy “being a little old-fashioned in a concern for Shakespeare’s characters,” but he illuminates tlie characterizations in a way far from old-fashioned. His view of charactcrizatiori is not at all what Shaw called the...