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thoreau

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 95–114.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Bruce Ronda Perry Miller’s 1958 edition of Henry David Thoreau’s “lost journal” for 1840–41, with its long and condescending introduction, prompted the leftist novelist Truman Nelson to engage in a bitter correspondence with Van Wyck Brooks and others, critiquing Miller’s approach to Thoreau...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 421–422.
Published: 01 December 1978
...JAMES M. COX GARBER FREDERICK. New York: New York University Press, 1977. x + 229 pp. $15.00, cloth; $4.95, paper. Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 JAMES M.COX 42 1 Thoreau’s Redemptive Imagination...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 307.
Published: 01 September 1961
...Frank W. Jones Leo Max Kaiser. Hartford, Conn.: The Emerson Society, 1960. Pp. 30. Copyright © 1961 by Duke University Press 1961 REVIEWS Thoreau’s Translation of “The Seven against Thebes” (1843). Edited by LEO MAXKAISER. Hartford, Conn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 307–308.
Published: 01 September 1961
...R. H. Super Fraser Neiman. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1960. Pp. xv + 398. $9.00. Copyright © 1961 by Duke University Press 1961 REVIEWS Thoreau’s Translation of “The Seven against Thebes” (1843). Edited by LEO MAXKAISER. Hartford, Conn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 422–424.
Published: 01 December 1978
...George Levine TILLOTSON GEOFFREY. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978. x + 396 pp. $15.95. Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 K EVI E LVS recognition, Thoreau engaged in perennial reconnoi terings for a stronger...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 300–302.
Published: 01 September 1982
... that “the world itself is an emblem of God” (p. 104), Thoreau, like Kraitsir, was also on the lookout for “proof . . . that at the roots of all languages was a unity of meaning and symbol” (p. 126) denoting their common origin, “a unity that demonstrated how, be- neath their temperamental differences...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 March 1987
..., indefinable. Thoreau, in the concluding sentences of Walden, puts it best: “There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star.” “If America is not ‘the Great Western Pioneer whom the nations follow. . . to what end does the world go on, and why was America discovered?’ ’* (p. 73, quoting from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 655–656.
Published: 01 December 1941
.... By F. 0. MATTHIESSEN.New York: Oxford University Press, 1941. Pp. xxiv + 678. $5.00. Mr. Matthiessen makes the focus of his study the major writ- ings of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman during the five-year period from 1850 to 1855. His purpose is to make...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 302–304.
Published: 01 September 1982
... by Wal- den Pond, the ardent seeker for hints of divinity in the speech and language of the Penobscots. Thoreau could agree that “a sound itself might symbolize something greater than the word in which it was embedded” (p. 129). The high point of Cura’s book is his discussion of Thoreau; he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (4): 519–520.
Published: 01 December 1943
...: An American. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1943. Pp. vi + 381. $3.75. Rabinovitz, Albert L. (compiler). New York University Index to Early American Periodical Literature, 1728-1870. No. 5, French Fiction. New York : The William-Frederick Press, 1943. Pp. 46. $1.50. Thoreau, Henry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 256–257.
Published: 01 June 1940
..., Thoreau, Margaret Ful- ler and William Gilmore Simms fails to exhibit the profusion, the complexities and the individual differences which it in reality pos- sessed. The critical theories of the naturalists are neglected. It is true that there was no literary critic who voiced...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (2): 173–186.
Published: 01 June 1988
... and allegories. In fact, the symbolic represen tations often had little to do with the “hegemonic process.” But more important, when American writers wanted to attack the dominant classes they did not have to do so in allegories. And that is why Shulman would prefer not to talk about Thoreau...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (4): 456–460.
Published: 01 December 1991
... devotes a chapter to works by Emerson and Thoreau that, he proposes, provide ”ways of developing modern tools for examining Transcen- dentalism” (p. 100)-although it is not clear why he retains that term and presumes that Emerson’s and Thoreau’s writings belong within it. Ironically, he derives...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (1): 7–19.
Published: 01 March 1993
... of literature knows how to catch the trout or what to do with it after it is caught. Many of my undergraduates, in fact, initially miss Thoreau’s point. Some are fascinated by the image itself, an incongruous symbol; some lack the historical background or imagination to picture what might happen to milk...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (2): 205–207.
Published: 01 June 1978
..., that the tale is mainly about anxiety. Moreover, slighting Melville’s allusions to Henry David Thoreau and St. Paul, he goes on to insist that “Cock-A-Doodle-Doo!” is also about 206 KEVIELVS anxiety, since the narrator of that story, too...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 98–100.
Published: 01 March 1966
... a number of stages from the Renaissance vaunting of individual achievement to the twentieth- century quest for personal identity, The modern conditions of Europe have generally been the prevailing national conditions of America, where Thoreau declared it to be a social fact: “What a man thinks...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 235–238.
Published: 01 September 1960
... Thoreau. But if one could not find it and did not have an established faith, one was reduced to living “en nous amusant, en revant amours monstres et univers fantastiques, en nous plaignant et en querellant les apparences du monde . . .” (p. 194). But for Rimbaud, his poetry had to come from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (2): 212–216.
Published: 01 June 1974
.... xii + 259 pp. $12.95. Aziz, Maqbool (editor). The Tales of Henry James. Volume I: 1864-1869. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973. I -t 5 16 pp. f 5.00; $16.00. Click, Wendell (editor). Henry D. Thoreau: Reform Papers. Princeton: Princeton University Press, Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, 1973...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 September 1946
...- that Sophocles was aloof from his times, that the later Wordsworth was a hidebound conservative, that Byron held a low opinion of the ballads, that Thoreau was uniquely original in his ideas. An espe- cially interesting paper of this kind is George Coffin Taylor’s refuta- tion of Theodore Spencer’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (4): 539–545.
Published: 01 December 2005
... and simultaneously reinforced it in the mind of the public. At the same time, American Renaissance figures such as Hawthorne, Thoreau, and Melville resisted this conception of American space. At least in some of their writings, the line between the domesticated and the wild grows troubled and confused...