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tamburlaine

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 330–332.
Published: 01 June 1942
... playwright, as the “romantics” contend. Mr. Rattenhouse does indeed collect a great store of evidence to show that orthodox Elizabethan thinkers judged as evil the qualities of ambition, cruelty, and the like manifested in Tamburlaine. But not all Eliza- bethans were orthodox, and if Marlowe himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (1): 18–27.
Published: 01 March 1954
...T. M. Pearce © 1954 University of Washington 1954 TAMBURLAINE’S “DISCIPLINE TO HIS THREE SONNES” AN INTERPRETATION OF TAMBURLAINE, PART II By T. M. PEARCE The title page of Tamburlaine, Part 11, as issued separately in the third edition by Edward White (1606...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 15–28.
Published: 01 March 1968
... of the loutish, demagogic leader of a violent people.* Poets and Playwrights (Minnea lis, 19W), p. 36. *Essays and Introductions (LonE, 1961), pp. 103-109. 15 16 HENRY V AND TAMBURLAINE Recent and more objective criticism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (3): 375–387.
Published: 01 September 1965
...Susan Richards Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 MARLOWE’S TAMBURLAINE II A DRAMA OF DEATH By SUSANRICHARDS In drama which treats a man who deals in death, death has a peculiar role of its own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (4): 315–320.
Published: 01 December 1960
...Michael Quinn Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 THE FREEDOM OF TAMBURLAINE By MICHAELQUINN Robert Greene was presumably the first to describe Marlowe’s Tamburlaine as an atheist, but we can no longer be sure what he meant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 March 1951
...T. M. Pearce Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 MARLOWE AND CASTIGLIONE By T. M. PEARCE Marlowe’s Tamburlaine has been acclaimed by nearly all critics as a culture symbol of the Renaissance. Yet the character has never been...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 332–334.
Published: 01 June 1942
.... Particularly at Tamburlaine’s death, which concludes the play, the audience is left with the re-affirmation of his philosophy of conquest and the prophecy of his reception into heaven. If this is Marlowe’s way of passing moral judgment on Tamburlaine, it is indeed a strange one. Finally, Mr...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 496–497.
Published: 01 December 1964
... that they reflect what is predominant in the playwright’s own moral nature. The author’s “real intentions, conscious or not,” he argues, are to be found in those places in a play where the imagination “is genuinely caught up and creative.” Hence, for example, lines such as Tamburlaine’s “Come let us...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 497–505.
Published: 01 December 1965
... Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus and the English morality plays. If the morality elements in that play are only vestiges, then the traditional view of Faustus as the aspiring Marlovian hero, whose rise to power is (like that of Tamburlaine) more interesting than his fall, will hold. But if Faustus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 119–120.
Published: 01 March 1944
..., is a much earlier play by (presumably) Richard Farrant, and is indeed, in Lawrence’s words, “the earliest private theatre play.” There can be few converts to this view, I feel sure, as long as readers compare the text of Tamburlaine with that of The Wars of Cyrzcs. The author of the latter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (2): 269–289.
Published: 01 June 2008
... on November 4 or 5 or both, as well as occasionally at other times.2 Its success is comparable with that of other famous plays concerning military leaders. Christopher Marlowe’s Tamburlaine the Great had no place in the eighteenth-century repertoire, but Tamerlane did well next to Joseph Addison’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (1): 27–34.
Published: 01 March 1957
... to define a moment of prosaic boredom as one of exquisite rapture. The failure to refer poetic language to action, however, reduces its possibilities within the dramatic form. Unassimilated by plot, language becomes as excessive or unmotivated. In Tamburlaine, for example, the diction...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (3): 274–275.
Published: 01 September 1954
... meaningful if seen as a workable alternative to that of the aspiring mind represented by Tamburlaine. By emphasizing the heroic elements in The Faerie Qwene, the author keeps us from straying too far into that wood of error into which C. S. Lewis lures us by his intense preoccupation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (3): 275–276.
Published: 01 September 1954
... meaningful if seen as a workable alternative to that of the aspiring mind represented by Tamburlaine. By emphasizing the heroic elements in The Faerie Qwene, the author keeps us from straying too far into that wood of error into which C. S. Lewis lures us by his intense preoccupation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (1): 7–14.
Published: 01 March 1953
... game in Tamburlaine, Part I1 (1587- 1588). This game, which keeps Tamhurlaine’s son from battle, incites the brutal father to stab him on the stage and then order his burial by concubines rather than have even common soldiers soil their hands by touching the corpse of such an effeminate brat...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 March 1944
..., in Lawrence’s words, “the earliest private theatre play.” There can be few converts to this view, I feel sure, as long as readers compare the text of Tamburlaine with that of The Wars of Cyrzcs. The author of the latter lacked Marlowe’s intellectuality ; he lacked his classical knowledge, his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 470–472.
Published: 01 December 1953
... Press, 1953. Pp. ix + 192. $4.50. Parr, Johnstone. Tamburlaine’s Malady and Other Essays on Astrology in Elizabethan Drama. University : University of Alabama Press, 1953. Pp. xiv + 158, $3.50. Person, Iienry A. (editor). Cambridge Middle English Lyrics. Seattle : Univer- sity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (2): 223–225.
Published: 01 June 1994
..., concentrating on The Troublesome Raigne of King John, The Misfortunes @Arthur, Tamburlaine (whose hero she sees as the ultimate inverter of order), TimofAtk, Troilus and Cressida, King bar, and Antmy and Ckpatra. There are also briefer treatments of other Jacobean “king plays,” including The TmFt,which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (1): 75–77.
Published: 01 March 1979
... of the major plays is solid and always interesting. In her excellent chapter on Tamburlaine she stresses “the tragic folly of literally acting out a poetic vision” (p. 137). After raising a series of challenging questions, she concludes that “for a man of ‘I’amburlaine’s ex- traordinary imagination...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 237–239.
Published: 01 June 1944
... from one or the other of these two extremely important Renaissance encyclo- pedic miscellanies. Dr. Izard is the first to point out that Marlowe’s Tamburlaine is probably indebted to the English Myrror (pp. 214- 216), even suggesting (p. 215) that “Whetstone’s chapter on Tam- burlaine...