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strickland

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 441–443.
Published: 01 December 1975
...B. F. Bart Geoffrey Strickland. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1974. xi + 302 pp. $16.50, cloth; $5.95, paper. Copyright © 1975 by Duke University Press 1975 GERHARD BAUMGAERI’EL 44 1 tionality notwithstanding, he also had...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 439–441.
Published: 01 December 1975
.... GERHARDBAUMCAERTEL Trent University Stendhal: The Education of a Novelist. By GEOFFREYSTRICKLAND. Cam- bridge: Cambridge University Press, 1974. xi + 302 pp. $16.50, cloth; $5.95, paper. Geoffrey Strickland, it should be noted at once, takes the word education of his title...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 443–444.
Published: 01 December 1975
... on those who do not share Strick- land’s views. Despite my regret for these attacks, they are but the other side of a coin, for Strickland’s personalism is also what makes the interest of his study. B. F. BART University of Pittsburgh...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (2): 179–181.
Published: 01 June 1982
... of this is of course necessary and illuminating, but there is too much throughout the book of the sort of thing that we see, for example, in the chapter on Presence, where John Strickland is cited on the twofold pres- ence of God: first his general or common presence, then his special pres- ence; under...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (2): 176–179.
Published: 01 June 1982
... on Presence, where John Strickland is cited on the twofold pres- ence of God: first his general or common presence, then his special pres- ence; under the second heading there are three sorts of God’s special pres- ence, etc., etc. Lieb writes to qualify the notion of Milton as an exclusively...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (1): 3–15.
Published: 01 March 1949
... also because the number “seven” possessed a special significance for him, if we are to credit W. W. Strickland.*O In addition, instead of emphasizing an “immense forward view” as stressed by Eichendorff, Poe was careful to explain that the opposite arrangement prevailed, yet he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (3): 294–300.
Published: 01 September 1987
..."; Fred Inglis, "Popular Culture and the Meaning of Feel- ing"; L. C. Knights, "Cambridge Criticism: What Was It Arthur Humphreys, "The Livingness of Literature"; Graham Martin, "Cambridge Criticism and 'History' "; Geoffrey Strickland, "More Than a Minor Phase"; W. W. Robson...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence or experience, with that divided or hybrid sensibility. After all, Kipling, though born in India, lived there only until he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 March 2013
... knowledge of hybrid figures like Kim, Mowgli, and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence or experience, with that divided or hybrid sensibility. After all, Kipling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 121–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to call this what it is: colonial fantasy. The fantasized native knowledge of hybrid figures like Kim, Mowgli, and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 126–129.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to call this what it is: colonial fantasy. The fantasized native knowledge of hybrid figures like Kim, Mowgli, and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 129–132.
Published: 01 March 2013
... knowledge of hybrid figures like Kim, Mowgli, and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence or experience, with that divided or hybrid sensibility. After all, Kipling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 132–135.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to call this what it is: colonial fantasy. The fantasized native knowledge of hybrid figures like Kim, Mowgli, and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 135–139.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., and Strickland ultimately served the interests of empire, not of India. Johnson also links birth, as opposed to long-­term residence or experience, with that divided or hybrid sensibility. After all, Kipling, though born in India, lived there only until he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 333–361.
Published: 01 September 2006
... as an overview of his views on particu- lar authors, see Geoffrey Strickland, “F. R. Leavis and ‘English,’ ” in The New Pelican Guide to English Literature, ed. Boris Ford, vol. 8 (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1983), 175 – 92. On the Movement and its antipathies toward the modernists see Rubin Rabi- novitz...