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stress

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 470–473.
Published: 01 December 1973
... the heroic past of Honier aiid Vergil is still the ideal. Wlietlier it need necessarily be descril>ccl iii large sociocultural ternis ;IS “forms preserved under stress” I am less certain. Swift of course (the an- guished Swift) is the extreme case of “passionately committed loyalty to cher...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 266–267.
Published: 01 June 1940
...Horace G. Rahskopf The Effect of Stress Upon Quantity in Dissyllables . By Norman E. Eliason and Roland C. Davis Bloomington: Indiana University Publications, Science Series, No. 8, 1939. Pp. 56. $1.00 Copyright 1940 by University of Washington Press 1940 266...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 March 2012
...Matt Eatough Bowen’s Court has most commonly been confronted through methodological paradigms stressing its affinity to traditional Irish generic and historiographical conventions. In contrast, this essay reassesses Anglo-Ireland’s contribution to early twentieth-century literature by rereading...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (1): 1–30.
Published: 01 March 2015
... the acceptable and the illicit were reconfigured, norms governing identity were reoriented, and the means of desiring-production were refashioned. Stressing structural shifts in practices and discourses of kinship formation, this approach supplements other theorizations of the sex/gender/relationship system...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (4): 481–507.
Published: 01 December 2008
... of analyzing literary influence. The Picture of Dorian Gray is the test case for such adaptations. I examine two forms of influence: local allusion and global revision of thematic and narrative structures. The psychology of memory for language provides tools for distinguishing among allusions by stressing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (3): 341–353.
Published: 01 September 2018
... “end of literature” essay. “Western Literary Theory in China” ends with a section about something the three Chinese authors do not stress, namely, the major changes in literary theory in every country, including China, brought about willy-nilly by the shift from print media to digital media. What...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (4): 441–464.
Published: 01 December 2020
..., the contemporary African novel returns to the particulars of national histories to explain change that has remained unacknowledged or misrepresented for political reasons. It grapples with the writing of history as a conscious process of what Edward W. Said describes as “textualization”: a narration that stresses...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 21–33.
Published: 01 March 1946
... is greater than a casual glance at several collec- tions of Spanish ballads would seem to indicate. The primitive verse was, normally, a sixteen-syllable line, with fixed stresses on the sev- enth syllable of each hemistich and a single assonance binding all the lines into one unit, This long line...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (3): 227–239.
Published: 01 September 1972
... prosody out of its sleepy ways and making progress rapidly. The most striking difference between the old way of scanning and the new was the difference between two stresses and four, and it appeared as a result that English prosody would have to be “redefined.” One could say: “If poetry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (4): 339–343.
Published: 01 December 1959
...- versary and the strategy he must consequently employ. The alliteration clearly does not fall on either syllable of fordon; the context avoids alliterative stress on ic (and the line does not permit it on me), and alliteration rather prominently stresses the enemy (and the former enemy Grendel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (1): 33–42.
Published: 01 March 1958
... 6My method of line division and scansion intentionally ignores the finer points of prosody in an effort to reduce ambiguity-always the greatest problem in studies like the present one. My working rule for assigning stress is that all 0.B. Hardison, Jr. 37...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (3): 376–377.
Published: 01 September 1948
... matter.” Storm-and-Stress primitivism, then, is not that of a Golden Age or of the Noble Savage; it is a doctrine of “naturalness.” Accordingly, Dr. Runge’s first chapter Stud A fkins 377 (“The Significance of Nature”) treats the closely related Storm...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 307–308.
Published: 01 September 1963
... to have four lifts, sometimes five or even seven. All these lines, she argues, have four major stresses, two in each half-line. She holds that there are three levels of stress: “unstressed,” and “minor” and “major chief syllables” (the latter marked “c” and “C “Extended” lines with five...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 308–310.
Published: 01 September 1963
...- stration of the three-lift structure of the rhyming lines in the “wheels.” She then examines the long alliterative lines, which seem sometimes to have four lifts, sometimes five or even seven. All these lines, she argues, have four major stresses, two in each half-line. She holds...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (3): 372–374.
Published: 01 September 1943
.... The results are presented in four chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. The Vowel Sounds of Stressed Syllables. 3. The Vowel Sounds of Unstressed and Partially Stressed Syllables. 4. The Consonants. Mr. Hall is careful not to present his findings as a complete and exhaustive record, yet it is difficult...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (1): 17–46.
Published: 01 March 1994
... by the prosodic form. Semanti- cally, patterns of intonation (pitch, stress) and of segmental phonemes (/p/, /e/) carry meaning through the differential organization in which the sound combinations have arbitrarily assigned significances. The second pattern is chosen by the poet, usually from the conven...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 643–644.
Published: 01 December 1941
... and the fall of final -m as “probably connected with the stress- accent.” This may be so because even during the Classic Latin period, stress was probably not entirely lacking even though met- rics were based on quantity and pitch, but there are many lines of Virgil that cannot be scanned...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 164–168.
Published: 01 June 1950
... philosophers and theologians. After the eighteenth century, the violence recedes, but the controversy is still alive at the beginning of our century in the writings of some idealists; and at the present moment, the stress that Existentialism puts on human freedom may again stir the fire under...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (4): 405–412.
Published: 01 December 1967
... and stronger stresses, and (2) a phrasal segmentation after each strong stress. Meter exerts this perceptual force simply because these two factors are what the experienced reader of English poetry has come to expect. To put the matter in terms more familiar, a reader who is experienced...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
....* The secondary phonemes of Pennsylvania German consist in features of stress and pitch, as well as those of juncture. These may As spoken in Lehigh County and the western half of Berks Ccunty: evidence based upon responses of forty-two informants in these areas to the questionnaire prepared...