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stoic

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 443–471.
Published: 01 December 2009
... readership. Scott's adaptations of sentimentalism and of theories of sympathy come into sharper focus, however, once one takes seriously his claim that Stoicism is his proper philosophy and traces his ironic treatment of the figure of the sympathetic Stoic undermined by sentiment back to its eighteenth...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (4): 449–463.
Published: 01 December 1992
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... and behavior, on the other. Influenced but not bound by Stoic and Christian conceptions of freedom, Hamlet can act most freely, and ultimately kill Claudius, after achieving a sense of inner moral freedom based on trust in a “divinity” that oversees the world. Joshua Scodel is Helen A. Regenstein...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 263–285.
Published: 01 June 1942
... of action, much less a braggart or miEes gloriosus. Rather he is the embodi- ment of an idea which Chapman derived from the Stoics, that of self-sufficiency, the all-sufficiency, of the virtuous man.1o Chapman’s characterization of Bussy as the Stoic “complete man” is part of his attempted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 364–366.
Published: 01 September 1951
... of a series of three books, of which the other two, provided for us by the same seventeenth-century scholar, are Stradling’s 1594 translation of Lipsius on Constancy (1939) and James’s 1598 translation of Du Vair on the moral philosophy of the Stoics (forthcoming). The three to- gether can show...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 459–490.
Published: 01 December 1990
... martial valor, stoic resolve, cruelty and revenge: these issues link it to other essays in Montaigne’s collec- tion and suggest that, in spite of its exotic subject, it needs to be understood in their larger context. In what follows, I shall try to embed Des cannibales in the Essais, noting how...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 142–157.
Published: 01 June 1960
....” This doctrine was affirmed by Socrates and given heavy emphasis by the Stoics. It became the central philosophy of consolation for exile. Of the early consolations for exile, Seneca’s Ad Helvium is an ex- cellent illustration of the type. In 41 B.c., we remember, Seneca was condemned...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (3): 319–340.
Published: 01 September 1991
... as literary secretary to the emperor and Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius, enters into his acquaintance with a Christian household, and concludes with his journey back to his home to visit his ancestral dead, his arrest on a mistaken charge of professing Christianity, his final illness, and his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (4): 339–357.
Published: 01 December 1979
... into question some familiar preconceptions about Chapman’s aims and outlook. The view that the play has a tripartite emphasis is not generally ac- cepted, for the assumption that Chapman is writing chiefly to express his Stoic philosophy and is speaking personally through a main pro- tagonist...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (1): 46–52.
Published: 01 March 1962
... peace with his allies. In other words, we forget that the poet may not have intended any of the Christian or Stoic values subsequently acquired by his words. All modern translations of the Chanson de Roland corrupt or con- fuse its ethos, and therefore its motivations, by failing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (3): 316–325.
Published: 01 September 1985
.... Maus notices that as Jonson moved on to tragedy and to his morally ambivalent comedies, his Stoic values were less useful. The Stoic personality is not given to tragedy or comedy, nor does it fit the demands of theater. In the comical satires he found a marginal place for it in the role...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 124–125.
Published: 01 March 1947
..., and (by inference) Shakespeare were almost for- gotten. Chapman and Jonson, who wrote for the public stage, were Stoics in morality and rather stern. Shak,espeare refuses to fit into the scheme, founded no school, and the author devotes a separate chapter to him. The reviewer thinks that in this matter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 125–126.
Published: 01 March 1947
... almost for- gotten. Chapman and Jonson, who wrote for the public stage, were Stoics in morality and rather stern. Shak,espeare refuses to fit into the scheme, founded no school, and the author devotes a separate chapter to him. The reviewer thinks that in this matter Shakespeare presents...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (2): 135–149.
Published: 01 June 1962
...- 137 But Lucentio’s servant Tranio advises his master to temper “this virtue and this moral discipline” with the enjoyment of love and poetry : Let’s be no Stoics nor no stocks, I pray, Or so devote to Aristotle’s checks As Ovid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (3): 203–218.
Published: 01 September 2001
.... A counterinterpretation was first proposed in the seven- teenth century by the French philologist André Dacier. Far from see- ing this event as a religious conversion, Dacier reads the poem ironi- cally, as a mockery of Stoic philosophy. According to Dacier, the Stoics, intent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (3): 235–249.
Published: 01 September 1985
... in a poem annexed to a prose analysis of free will, the senses, art, and the imagination. After detailing the hierarchy of knowing-senses, imagination, reason, intelligence (Boece 5, pr. 4)-Lady Philosophy recites a poem on sense impressions and the mind. She denounces the Stoic philosophers, “ful...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 246–249.
Published: 01 June 2020
... Hamlet? Second, are Christian and Stoic ideas of providence truly compatible? Hamlet indeed does say that “there is a special providence in the fall of a sparrow” (5.2.150). 2 I wonder how we read this alongside Horatio’s nihilistic “carnal, bloody, and unnatural acts, / . . . accidental judgements...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1963
... and harsh invective with still a third tone of “fairly elaborate” Neo-Stoic argumentation. In fact, the use of this “trifold persona,” with the unusually dramatic quality of the exempla and char- acter sketches, not only defines Marston’s originality as a satirist, but convinc- ingfy explains...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (3): 322–325.
Published: 01 September 1983
... argues that it is misleading and imprecise to term John- son a Stoic. Johnson “would surely have repudiated the label with indigna- tion. . . . Johnson deeply distrusted the self-regarding Stoic ethic and the erroneous theology on which it rests” (p. 27). Christianity, with its promise of hope...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 198–201.
Published: 01 June 1972
..., as Georges May implies, Diderot meets adversity with stoic dignity. hloi is then “a Diderot who represents all that is noble in ancient Greek thought, pitted against the folly of his age in the person of Lui” (p. 50). ‘I’he reactions of Diderot to the denigration of man in Helvetius’s Z)e l’esprzt...