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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (1): 80–91.
Published: 01 March 1983
...L. G. Swingle Copyright © 1983 by Duke University Press 1983 1 R. D. Stock. The Holy and the Daemonic from Sir Thomas Browne to William Blake. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982. 395 pp. $27.50. CLASSIC AND ROMANTIC' By L. J...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 285–301.
Published: 01 June 1965
... wilderness are all isolated from their full natural background, cut through and viewed in height- ened sections, so that bits of words, phrases, objects, and complex scenes are drawn into a bewildering but dynamic whole. In large part, Williams’ effort is to fight stock response by the cubist...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 272–273.
Published: 01 September 1962
...V. L. O. Chittick A. G. Stock. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1961. Pp. xii + 255. $5.50. Copyright © 1962 by Duke University Press 1962 REVIEWS W. B. Yeats: His Poetry and nought. By A. G. STOCK.New York: Cam- bridge University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (1): 51–74.
Published: 01 March 2010
... suggests that stock-market crashes were “too immediate a real- ity of nineteenth-century England to operate strongly as a symbolic or emblematic convention in literature” (191), he adds later that “the most contemporary representative of Mammonism, the speculator,” func- tioned as “a topos for what...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 236–237.
Published: 01 June 1951
... is the “stock diction” in the poetry of natural description of the eighteenth century, that favorite football for critics since Wordsworth. Adopting Quayle’s formulations of the distinguishing characteristics of stock diction, Arthos comes closely to grips with the essential problems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 116–119.
Published: 01 March 1946
... of these shadings he would seem to be fairly anticipated by his forerun- ners, especially Nlr. Bateson. Mr. Case follows MI-.Rlorrah in noting that even if Relinda plays sans prendre, her opponents have the priv- ilege of drawing from the stock. It is certain then that Pope has neglected to mention one...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (2): 161–179.
Published: 01 June 1973
... form of com- 161 162 DICKINSON mercial enterprise), the stock market, auctions, labor (viewing her- self as independent artisan, employer, and employee), and finance (at that point where the law and economics converge-n...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 23–35.
Published: 01 March 1940
...Archer Taylor Copyright © 1940 by Duke University Press 1940 THE THEMES COMMON TO ENGLISH AND GERMAN BALLADRY By ARCHERTAYLOR The comparison of the English and the German stock of bal- lads has never dealt...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 353–355.
Published: 01 December 1952
... the extent of Malone’s atrocity; had I been churchwarden of Stratford, I would have set the knave in the stocks. I shall take an early opportunity of calling in Tavistock Place. Believe me, Dear Sir...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 152–153.
Published: 01 March 1942
... consistent- ly if not “scientifically.” The types Dr. Garrett lists are: the dandy, the coquette, the pure woman in white, the prude, the blue stocking, men of virtue, repulsive scoundrels and monomaniacs. Although she does not say so, one is inclined to conclude from her illustrations...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (3): 228–232.
Published: 01 September 1959
... of it is both symptomatic and exemplary of its emergence as a stock motif in the eighteenth-century didactic epic. The seasonal theme conspicuous in Virgil’s example is under- scored in the change of “As in successive Toil the Seasons rofl” (376) to “As in successive course the seasons roll” (121...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 613–615.
Published: 01 December 1969
... stock. Shakespeare clung to the traditional vocabulary” (p. 97). This may well be roughly true, but Wickham sets out to demonstrate the thesis by quoting a passage of verse from Troilus, and then a passage from Jon- son’s Preface to Volfione, addressed to “The two famous Universities.” He...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 124–126.
Published: 01 March 1943
... the days of the greatest stock companies in American history, and among the actors who composed them were such immortals as John Drew, Ada Rehan, Otis Skinner, May Irwin, Nat Goodwin, De Wolf Hopper, Maurice Barrymore, E. H. Sothern, Mrs. Gilbert, Kyrle Bellew, and Rose Coghlan. Among others...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 611–613.
Published: 01 December 1969
... spell- ing). ‘gJonson,” Wickham says, “embraced the new words of Greek and Latin stock. Shakespeare clung to the traditional vocabulary” (p. 97). This may well be roughly true, but Wickham sets out to demonstrate the thesis by quoting a passage of verse from Troilus, and then a passage from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (2): 169–189.
Published: 01 June 1994
... geniuses and talents, for want of the power or disposition to barter and exchange, cannot be brought into a common stock, and do not in the least contribute to better accommodation and conveniency of species. (16) Smith did not stop with negating the assumptions of the discourse...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 273–275.
Published: 01 September 1962
... about it recorded in his later declaration, “I am content to live it all again / And yet again. . . .” As his mastery of verse matured, he ventured steadily toward employing it in consideration of mundane affairs, until with the Easter uprising of 1916 he threw himself, in Miss Stock’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (1): 131–133.
Published: 01 March 1953
... of my wares, the conclusion to be drawn is that my whole stock, or most of it, is to be rejected. As Parry well knows, there are others who take a different view, but I do not want to shelter myself behind their endorsement. I believe it can be shown that it is Parry himself whose logic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 315–318.
Published: 01 June 1942
... word stock, its mimicry, its successes and failures. Schooled in the old philological method of untiring search after scientific truth, and unrelenting, exhaustive treatment of his subject, he wished to get at the very bottom of his author’s linguistic peculiarities. He used a veritable...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 205–216.
Published: 01 June 1950
... American rival in literary criticism, as she became six years later,s she was, nevertheless, a well-known and much marveled at “blue stocking.” Everyone around Boston had heard of her. In February of that year she saw into print her fifth piece of writing. Each was an essay of erudition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (3): 243–258.
Published: 01 September 1964
... in unison at intervals, derive from oral sources and ancient ritual. However, the poet’s use of these stock conventions is not simply old-fashioned and certainly not uncritical or pointless. Although the JERRY D. JAMES 245 convention itself may...