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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 185–188.
Published: 01 June 1960
... comments, but by some seventy-four delightful illustrations by Felix Kelly. HELENA. KAUFMAN University of Washington History of the Royal Society, by Thomas Sprat. Edited by JACKSON I. COPEand HAROLDWHITMORE JONES. Saint Louis...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (4): 399–406.
Published: 01 December 1951
...H. Fisch; H. W. Jones Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 BACON’S INFLUENCE ON SPRAT’S HISTORY OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY By H. FISCHand H. W. JONES The general indebtedness of any apology for science...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 179–187.
Published: 01 June 1946
... of the seventeenth century has been well estab1ished.l This paper is the result of an attempt to find who, within the Royal Society, was the prime mover in this effort. The substantial body of evidence surveyed here points clearly to John Wilkins, showing that he was primarily responsible for Sprat’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 279–290.
Published: 01 September 1946
... been overlooked in previous discussions because no one had observed Sprat’s warning that part of the book had been written and printed above two years before the rest. “‘Above two years Emerson says, “. . . puts the printing of the first and most of the second part as early as the first...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 184–185.
Published: 01 June 1960
... University of Washington History of the Royal Society, by Thomas Sprat. Edited by JACKSON I. COPEand HAROLDWHITMORE JONES. Saint Louis : Washington University Studies, 1958. Pp. xxxii + 439 + 78. $7.50. An edition of Sprat’s History has long been desired, for the original editions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 188–189.
Published: 01 June 1960
.... In sum, the Puritan attitude toward the language of the Bible, the emphasis on literalness, on the naked meaning of a perfect text, leads to the position of Wilberforce in the nineteenth century; and Sprat is the ancestor of Huxley. Bacon, not the Puritans, is the ancestor of Sprat’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 382–383.
Published: 01 September 1947
..., flounder, sprats,” or “other worthy if second rate fish” like plaice and bass and skate (Lord forbid!) and gurnet? But “to eat and to celebrate in verse a thing which is at best a cooked cotton counterpane, is shock- ing.” Cowper had one redeeming feature, however ; he enjoyed good wine...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 504–505.
Published: 01 December 1947
... some knowledge of Chettle or Sprat or Albert Smith. Once the folk ballad was accepted into the sacred precincts of literature, it was only a matter of time until other varieties of popular entertainment would follow. The customary dismissal of nineteenth-century English draiiia...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 505–506.
Published: 01 December 1947
... the social and literary atmos- phere, the popular taste and the changing fashions which surrounded the work of major authors. The achievement of Shakespeare or Dryden or Dickens cannot be fully evaluated without some knowledge of Chettle or Sprat or Albert Smith. Once the folk ballad...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 76–77.
Published: 01 March 1956
..., and Coleridge. This is not the place to pursue this tangled question. As for the stupidity of Lord Kames and Thomas Sprat, how- ever, it may be suggested that the discovery of the absurd is the beginning and not the end of the task for the historian of ideas. And as for the absolute value...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 201–203.
Published: 01 June 1951
... chapters is devoted to Bacon, containing a lengthy translation from Bodley’s letter, that Bacon is referred to in the passages from Sprat’s history of the Royal Society translated in the chapter “Naturwissenschaften in England,” and that the chapter “Innere Mangel der Societiit” begins...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 June 1989
... of the civil wars and of governmental censorship. He is most interesting on the campaign for linguistic reform spearheaded by the Royal Society. The writings of Thomas Sprat, Joseph Glanvill, and other reformers on this subject, Markley dem- onstrates, simply cannot be accepted uncritically...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 77–79.
Published: 01 March 1956
... this tangled question. As for the stupidity of Lord Kames and Thomas Sprat, how- ever, it may be suggested that the discovery of the absurd is the beginning and not the end of the task for the historian of ideas. And as for the absolute value of Coleridge’s aesthetics, despite the brave and ingenious...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (4): 358–360.
Published: 01 December 1958
... (editors). History of the Royal Society, by Thomas Sprat. St. Louis : Washington University Studies, 1958. Pp. xxxii + 439 + 78. $7.50. Dahinten, Gisela. Die Geisterszene in der Tragdie vor Shakespeare : Zur Seneca-Nachfolge im englischen und lateinischen Drama des Elisabethanismus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 79–94.
Published: 01 March 1940
... by Sprat, the biographer of Cowley. His life of the poet was once highly regarded for its elegance; today it is chiefly valued for the few facts that Sprat extracted from the correspondence before de- stroying it. Autobiographical writings are very valuable for the biographer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 481–497.
Published: 01 December 1940
... a copy,56 would pre- sent his book soon after its publication. Nevertheless the time con- junction is impressive;57nor is it possible to believe that Evelyn was unaware of the relation of the Parallel’s subject-matter to the trade- history of architecture. Sprat in his History cites...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (2): 171–193.
Published: 01 June 1998
..., and Sir Pol, in particular, seems to be con- stantly “rummaging through the contents of some gothic lumber-room of the imagination, turning out toothpicks and baboons, oranges, muskmelons, apricots, porpoises and lion-whelps, tinderboxes, onions, sprats, frayed stockings and Selsey cockles...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 191–204.
Published: 01 June 1943
..., not having, as they say, the thing.” 17 Ibid., XI, 162. 18 The word occurs in Dryden’s Essay on Dramatic Poesy (1668). “A servant who has much wit to strike in with him, and help to dupe his father.” 19 It occurs in Thomas Sprat’s Observations on Monsieur dc Smbiet/s Yoyage into England...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 185–198.
Published: 01 June 1948
..., who while a fellow at Queens had prepared its first English edition, might have prompted him to read it sometime during the two years Sprat says Cowley spent in Oxford. Though we may not be able to say precisely when he read the treatise, only perverse- ness would make us believe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (1): 92–111.
Published: 01 March 1970
...- pressed stylistic norm: ars celare artem. “Bacon’s stylistic legacy to his followers is great. . . . [He] articulated the notion of writers like Wil- kins, Eachard, South, and at times, Glanvill and Sprat that the best style for prose is no style at all” (p. 76).3 Jones contends...