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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1979) 40 (1): 37–52.
Published: 01 March 1979
...CHARLES PALLISER © 1979 University of Washington 1979 “A CONSCIOUS PRIZE” MORAL AND AESTHETIC VALUE IN THE SPOILS OF POYNTON By CHARLESPALLISER The somewhat notorious critical controversy over “The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1985) 46 (1): 64–80.
Published: 01 March 1985
... Spoil were originally pitblistted by William Heinemann ill London and William Morrow in New York. All citations refer to this one-volunie edition of the Quartet; future references ill be niade within the text. 2 Caroline Moorehead, “Getting Engrossed in the Death-Throes of the Kqj...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1962) 23 (1): 91–92.
Published: 01 March 1962
...), i.e., “prahlen,” a reference to I Chron. xxv.5: “All these were the sons of Heinan the king’s seer in the words of God, to lift up the horn”? Is this modern colloquial English? “Don’t spoil the ship for a ha’porch,” which is rendered “Man sol1 nicht am unrechten Ende sparen” (p. 184...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1940) 1 (2): 262–265.
Published: 01 June 1940
...; that the soldier-author’s prejudices are only those of his race, age, and station ; that the only animosity expressed is upon the occasion of the unfair division of spoils ; and that investigation discloses no evi- dence of self-glorification or other uherior motive for falsification. This...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1940) 1 (2): 262–265.
Published: 01 June 1940
... ; that the only animosity expressed is upon the occasion of the unfair division of spoils ; and that investigation discloses no evi- dence of self-glorification or other uherior motive for falsification. This assumption of reliability is strengthened by a comparison of the discussion of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1962) 23 (1): 92–94.
Published: 01 March 1962
... example, is “to lift up the horn” (p. lUS), i.e., “prahlen,” a reference to I Chron. xxv.5: “All these were the sons of Heinan the king’s seer in the words of God, to lift up the horn”? Is this modern colloquial English? “Don’t spoil the ship for a ha’porch,” which is rendered “Man sol1 nicht...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1952) 13 (1): 21–22.
Published: 01 March 1952
... rehearsing procedure for taking purses and meeting again at night in Ursula’s booth to share the spoils. Like Chaucer’s physician and apothecary, they have an understanding of old, not now beginning, and so direc- tions can be brief. Ursula says : Enough, talke no more on’t : your...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 370–371.
Published: 01 September 1948
... translation the effect may be spoiled, and it is a question whether the translation should not be included ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 366–367.
Published: 01 September 1946
... iniquitous, in the making of English literature. The sparkle of Hood’s account never wholly conceals the fact that Alvan S. Ryan 367 his life at this point had its usual portion of concerns, domestic, physical, arid financial. But they seem to have spoiled...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 367–368.
Published: 01 September 1946
..., physical, arid financial. But they seem to have spoiled the fun as little for Hood as for his readers a century later. “To my comfort,” he told Dilke, “all our tragics have a goodly proportion of farce along with them. Even the doctoring makes one laugh as well as cry.” This was his salvation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 371–372.
Published: 01 September 1946
... Louis Parrington that life in England and on the Continent was detrimental to James’s literary life (pp. ix-x) ; he has gone to con- siderable pains to refute the opinions of some commentators that James’s revisions rather spoiled than enhanced his works (pp. 152- 86) ; he has...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1969) 30 (1): 64–85.
Published: 01 March 1969
... opulent America, in return for which “Beauty” will inevitably be spoiled and tarnished by vulgarity. The dialogue serves as the model for the novel: Anthony and Gloria Patch, the special people, the beautiful couple of the new and exciting America, spoil and squander themselves, are damned as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1981) 42 (2): 208–210.
Published: 01 June 1981
... event” (p. 159). Yet Culler sounds a note of mirthful triumph when Riffaterre and Fish fall prey to this contradiction; he almost seems to regard them as promising theoreticians who were spoiled by being such gifted interpreters. We need to bear in mind that Culler has singled out these...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1982) 43 (1): 87–89.
Published: 01 March 1982
..., driven by a complicated mixture of self-interest and altruism, plot against one another for the prize. As we read both Pottle and Buchanan, we forget for the time the fabulous nature of the spoils themselves and are engrossed in the strata- gems devised to win them...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1954) 15 (3): 285–286.
Published: 01 September 1954
... of verdorben (each of which translates as “spoiled But synonomy is, to be sure, a tricky affair (a Sym- nymisches Worterbuch, for instance, would look quite different) . Professor Farrell has arranged his book under English headings and added alphabetical lists of the English and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 247–249.
Published: 01 June 1944
... Review, IX [ 19341, 173-195), is fascinating read- ing on that subject. The reason, of course, for this sudden interest has been to find a motivation for the dreadful murder, and indeed explanations perhaps too realistically chosen are threatening to spoil our picture of that great scholar. It...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1977) 38 (4): 408–411.
Published: 01 December 1977
... of the spoils following the Roman rape of Corinth, and, “momentarily depressed, determines to forego a day’s pleasure” (p. 44). Cavafy’s use of history is highly selective: Cavafy ignores the centuries between 1458 and his own, just as he all but ignores Egyptians in Egypt. And...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1961) 22 (4): 399–401.
Published: 01 December 1961
... for literal “realms of gold” ; the sestet reveals the application of the literal to the figurative. erafz4rc, KXIX (1957), 50, notes that ‘“On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer’ inspires a number of images [The Golden Bowl cited] : conquest de- mands faith and courage, brings spoils-and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1955) 16 (4): 370–372.
Published: 01 December 1955
.... Does it spoil one’s aesthetic enjoyment of a poem to know too much about its “heredity”? Is it justifiable to “go behind the returns” and ransack the poet’s suppressed manuscripts, as the “biographiles,” on a literal level, ransack his private life?’ Mr. Henel considers the objection frankly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1955) 16 (4): 372–374.
Published: 01 December 1955
... her automobile because “considered as a sensation speed, when it is outside us, is such an impersonal thing! (And does it not spoil your enjoyment of that other, intrinsic speed, So rapid that, like that of the stars, it resembles immobility Here is a typical thought of the late Rilke...