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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (2): 173–204.
Published: 01 June 2017
...Catherine Nicholson Abstract Unlike the works of contemporaries like William Shakespeare and John Donne, Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene (1590 and 1596) is almost invariably reproduced by modern editors with its peculiar sixteenth-century spellings intact, on the grounds that orthographic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 175–184.
Published: 01 June 1940
... edition of Webster’s New International Dictionary defines the phoneme as : “A group of variants of a speech sound, usually all spelled with the same or equivalent letter and commonly regarded as the same sound, but varying somewhat with the same speaker according to different pho- netic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 463–475.
Published: 01 December 1946
... constituted such an authority and provided such a standard. But English, though it was not below these two in literary rank, had not --so it was felt-achieved a similar linguistic perfection. Its vocabu- lary had not been “refined,” its spelling and pronunciation were still unsettled, and its...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (3): 229–232.
Published: 01 September 1962
... editions of Beowulf it should not then be possible to assume that the manuscript lay unknown and unused for five and a half centuries when there is the best testimony that someone in the Middle English period was interested enough in The Marvels at least to write current spellings of words...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 5–8.
Published: 01 March 1942
... for the moment, and start with conventional spelling, the true pattern readily emerges. The symbol [ y ] of ordinary English orthography represents our phoneme well enough (though this symbol has other uses besides, uses which we need not consider here). The palatal semivowel [y], like the liquids...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 363–364.
Published: 01 September 1951
.... Duthie presents his critical old-spelling text based on the Folio, with a full apparatus of the Q and F variants. In his choice of substantive readings there would seem little reason to qualify the results of his critical method, and in this respect we have what is probably the most...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 139–145.
Published: 01 June 1947
..., for the most part swanmaidens.l B. It is the temporary abode of a man or a woman lying under a spell, and the would-be liberators are accordingly expected to climb it, penetrate it, or simply cross it.2 C. A princess is placed there by her own father, often at her own request...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (4): 400–411.
Published: 01 December 1964
...) Throughout the tale the narrator calls attention to Geraldine’s bright- ness and the glitter of her clothing. The emphasis on her dress and external appearance contrasts sharply with the description of her bosom, which has the power to work a spell on Christabel. In a variant reading the narrator...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 376–378.
Published: 01 September 2021
... summarizing the allegory of the poem for five-year-olds. The history of the poem’s readers fuels a skepticism about critical assumptions, evident in the first chapter’s treatment of Spenser’s spelling. Seventeenth-century reprintings gradually modernized the orthography, but subsequent editors...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 257–260.
Published: 01 June 1947
... inadequacy. It is true that a definitive word- geography of Germany has not been completed, but our present knowledge goes beyond the inadequate and misleading classification used by this dictionary. The paragraphs on “German Spelling and Pronunciation” are clear and concise. The system...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 122–123.
Published: 01 March 1946
..., it is possible that those references about the author living in Virginia, sending his manuscript to a friend in England, and being in a poor state of health are designedly false clues. A brief check against the vocabulary and spelling of the Byrd I1 portion showed that Byrd I1 was not the author...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (4): 381–387.
Published: 01 December 1945
... spellings). The scribe writes both joztr and your for the original your. (3) frenzy might stand for friendly, but I suspect that the abbreviation for n is an error and that the original was the common ME frely “goodly,” “lovely” (see NED, S.V. freely, adj.) (4) See comment on line 2. (5...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 458–463.
Published: 01 December 1949
..., the difficulty of using rhyme and meter resulted in the following errors : pronunciation of sounds nor- mally silent in French (Lucas: charitks spelled to rhyme with merites; Brevint : cudawes spelled to rhyme with uniuers) and suppression of sounds normally pronounced in French (Holles : uurions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (2): 141–166.
Published: 01 June 2002
... is reinforced by Chatterton’s emphasis on how the church, as both insti- tution and physical space, mediates the friendship of Canynge and Rowley. His ostentatiously irregular spelling (another method of “anti- quating”) licenses double entendres that contribute to this effect; the name Saint Mary Redcliffe...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 472–475.
Published: 01 September 1942
... variety of French seems to me to lose all point unless it be considered somewhat satirical. Professor Hoops reassembles1 and analyzes the evidence con- cerning the spelling, pronunciation, meaning and origin of the name Shakespeure. If one spelling is to be accepted, as is now...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (3): 372–374.
Published: 01 September 1943
... by [A] in such words as steady, trestle, whether (pp. 20, 21) ; (4) the use of an open [ae] which verges toward [a] before r in such words as air, curry, parent, square, and bear, of which the last is often represented by the spell- ing b'ur (p. 24) ; (5) frequent use of [ae] in such words as crop, drop...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 March 1946
... against the vocabulary and spelling of the Byrd I1 portion showed that Byrd I1 was not the author of the ESSQ~,and that the printer, Richard Parker, did not alter the spelling of the written manuscript (what- ever it was) to any systematic style established by the printer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 364–366.
Published: 01 September 1951
...Rosemond Tuve Rudolf Kirk. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1948. Pp. xiii + 214. $5.00. Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 364 Reviews by which every old-spelling text must be judged-ertain necessary biblio- graphical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 September 1951
... for standardized spelling and grammar. Lexicographers and “normative grammarians” have learned a great deal from linguistics lately, and the results may prove very beneficial in the long run. It is now rather widely known that languages change and that standards change with them. The best way...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 33–44.
Published: 01 March 1944
..., Text, I, 173-74, 177-78. 33 34 The Scribe of the Chaucer Maizuscript Parallels to the vagaries of spelling in Gg can be found in other English texts from the first half of the fifteenth century, notably certain of the Paston...