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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1990) 51 (1): 44–62.
Published: 01 March 1990
...Lewis Horne Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 THE WAY OF RESENTMENT IN DOMBEY AND SON BJJ LEWISHORNE “Oh, upon my word and honour, . . . this is a most wretched sort of affair this world is! Somebody’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1975) 36 (4): 390–402.
Published: 01 December 1975
...Stanley Tick Copyright © 1975 by Duke University Press 1975 THE UNFINISHED BUSINESS OF DOMBEY AND SON By STANLEYTICK Let me begin by making two generalized observations about Dombey and Son. It is the first of his novels which Dickens...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1976) 37 (2): 179–195.
Published: 01 June 1976
...Jenijoy La Belle Copyright © 1976 by Duke University Press 1976 THEODORE ROETHKE’S “THE LOST SON” FROM ARCHETYPES TO LITERARY HISTORY By JENIJOY LA BELLE Sooner or later in almost every lengthy study of Theodore Roethke the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1953) 14 (2): 227–228.
Published: 01 June 1953
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1964) 25 (3): 346–355.
Published: 01 September 1964
...J. D. Hainsworth Copyright © 1964 by Duke University Press 1964 SHAKESPEARE, SON OF BECKETT? By J. D. HAINSWORTH As long ago as 1919, T. S. Eliot was arguing that the literature of the past could be altered by the literature of the present: The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1966) 27 (4): 388–401.
Published: 01 December 1966
...John T. Shawcross Copyright © 1966 by Duke University Press 1966 THE SON IN HIS ASCENDANCE A READING OF PARADISE LOST By JOHN T. SHAWCROSS The stated subject of Paradise Lost is Man’s disobedience, and there- fore the climax of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1955) 16 (4): 374–376.
Published: 01 December 1955
... is why, after reading a Rilke poem in translation, one always returns to the original with renewed admiration for the master’s skill. H. F. PETERS Reed College Stefan George: son ~UZYCpodtique. By CLAUDEDAVID. Lyon and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1990) 51 (4): 567–569.
Published: 01 December 1990
... lesser benefits gained along the way in the searching and stimulating studies of individual plays and playwrights. MARVINCARLSON City University of New York D. H. Lawrence: “Sons and Lowers. Penguin Critical Studies. By Brian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1968) 29 (3): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 1968
... TALBERT University of North Carolina The Sons of Ben: Jonsonian Comedy in Caroline England. By JOE LEE DAVIS.Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1967. 252 pp. $8.95. The Sons of Ben-the minor Caroline comic dramatist+who reads them? To put the question more brusquely, who...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 109–114.
Published: 01 March 1941
...Seabury M. Blair Copyright © 1941 by Duke University Press 1941 THE SUCCESSION OF LIVES IN SPENSER’S THREE SONS OF AGAPE By SEABURYM. BLAIR In their attempt to find a symbolised philosophy for the Fourth Book of the Faerie...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1942) 3 (4): 547–557.
Published: 01 December 1942
...Roland M. Smith Copyright © 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 SPENSER’S TALE OF THE TWO SONS OF MILES10 By ROLANDM. SMITH In his study “Amidas v. Bracidas” in this journal’ Herbert B. Nelson traces the background of Spenser’s episode (Faerie Queene, Book V, iv. 4...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1966) 27 (1): 51–67.
Published: 01 March 1966
...Heinz Moenkemeyer Copyright © 1966 by Duke University Press 1966 THE SON’S FATAL HOME-COMING IN WERNER AND CAMUS By HEINZMOENKEMEYER Der Vierundzwanzigste Februar, a one-act tragedy written by the German romanticist...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 432–434.
Published: 01 December 1974
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2015) 76 (2): 159–180.
Published: 01 June 2015
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1967) 28 (2): 192–206.
Published: 01 June 1967
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2010) 71 (3): 229–269.
Published: 01 September 2010
... ladder of Creation. The vision of “things invisible to mortal sight” that the poet asks for in the opening invocation is analogized, in the divine council that the book goes on to depict, to the Son's faith in his triumph over death. False analogy leads the fools of the Limbo of Vanity to understand God...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... son of the murdered king is limited in his freedom to maneuver and whose quest for freedom is both fueled and stymied by the Ghost's command that he kill his uncle. Hamlet dramatizes the felt connections between external constraints on freedom of action and internal states that inhibit or foster such...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2013) 74 (4): 441–463.
Published: 01 December 2013
... “double blessing” that Polonius gives Laertes shows this ritual comically, as do those of earlier sons Launce and Launcelot in The Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Merchant of Venice ; All’s Well That Ends Well renders it confusingly in feudal transition into a new age. King Lear offers it in the peaceful...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1943) 4 (1): 27–47.
Published: 01 March 1943
...J. C. Chessex Copyright © 1943 by Duke University Press 1943 LES INTENTIONS DE MOLIfiRE By J. C. CHESSEX De nos jours, on dklare volontiers que Molicre Ctait avant tout un homme de th&tre-nC, un acteur, et un auteur comique qui cher- chait surtout i plaire i son...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2017) 78 (2): 275–277.
Published: 01 June 2017
..., Thomas Hobbes, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, and Heinrich von Kleist, the father comes to the fore not only as the symbolic “no(m)-du-Père”—which “presents the father as the one who both gives his name along with a place in the social order and says no” (4), and thus inscribes each subject-as-son—but indeed...