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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1968) 29 (3): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 1968
... varieties of comic “sock” worn by their authors-the “learned sock,” the “sentimental sock,” the “stuffedsock,” and the “sophisticated sock”-nor are we allowed to forget this schoolmasterish whimsey, which pursues us clumsily through numerous inelegant variations: “When the Sons of Ben pulled on...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1953) 14 (1): 82–97.
Published: 01 March 1953
...” here.* “ein zierliches Gewand / FlieL3t dir von Schultern zu den Socken” (5545-46)-FV “die Socke sock (5546) .” Walz, pp. 223-25, dis- cusses this passage in connection with 1807 ff. ; although I agree with FV reading of “ellenhohe Socke” as “ell-high soccus,” Walz’s “Socken subst. masc...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1988) 49 (4): 407–411.
Published: 01 December 1988
... Happened are dominated by monotonous self-pity. Characters who do not pull up their socks and forge ahead get no sympathy from Gullette no matter what the perspective of the author. Gullette intelligently qualifies the “safe at last” in her title, recognizing that middle life is still full of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 451–457.
Published: 01 December 1949
... he was traveling without a socks from his monastery, was not obliged to a public recitation. That circum- stance was a felicitous one for him, we may be assured. Finally, this custom, which had originated with St. Basil, became more common with St. Benedict and his followers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1948) 9 (4): 448–466.
Published: 01 December 1948
... . . .] ;.3. a new handkerchief, new handkerchiefs; 4. the sock [had a hole in it], the socks; 5. the shoes [are too small] ; 6. a woman’s clothes. 59 1. the dress(es) [woman’s] ; 2. a long skirt, long skirts; 3. the blouse, blouses; 4. a nice brooch; 5. a bracelet; 6. a necklace; 7. wedding...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1992) 53 (4): 449–463.
Published: 01 December 1992
... about him like a wornout sock” (W, p. 313).22 It is an example of Faulkner reading The Sound and the Fury as a source for his later com- mentaries on literature’s precarious proximity to insignificance, and it suggests the importance of Macbeth’s final soliloquy as an intertextual source...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1956) 17 (2): 118–127.
Published: 01 June 1956
... odds and ends of patches-dd socks, old trowser-legs, and the like-I bedarned and bequilted the inside of my jacket, till it became, all over, stiff and padded, as King James’s cotton-stuffed and dagger-proof doublet ; and no buckram or steel hauberk stood up more stoutly.” But as he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1958) 19 (2): 147–159.
Published: 01 June 1958
...), 16: “[A shocking catastrophe ought never to find a place in a romance which professes to wear the sock.. . . 156 The English Novel: A ‘Critical’ View, 1756-1785 tude of the critics toward borrowing criteria from these two forms may be expressed in this manner: Whether novel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1975) 36 (4): 403–417.
Published: 01 December 1975
...) is swear-hold for mouth, as in “Sock it right in the swear-hold” (p. 130), and its variant, grub-hold, as in “Shut your grub-hold” (p. 128). Their origin may be Low German, one or two metamorphoses earlier. Fluchloch and Futterloch seem far- fetched and artificial approximation To talk about...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 291–294.
Published: 01 June 2008
... known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as he said. He also disapproved of Hemans’s flippancy in conversation and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 295–299.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the truth, both in her life and in her work. Wordsworth seems to have known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 299–303.
Published: 01 June 2008
... known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as he said. He also disapproved of Hemans’s flippancy in conversation and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 303–306.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the truth, both in her life and in her work. Wordsworth seems to have known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 306–309.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the truth, both in her life and in her work. Wordsworth seems to have known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 310–313.
Published: 01 June 2008
... the truth, both in her life and in her work. Wordsworth seems to have known the truth already: he agreed with Hemans’s sometime husband that she couldn’t or wouldn’t darn socks, and he hoped to improve matters by presenting her with a gift of domestic scales — indispensable for huswifery, as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1969) 30 (4): 564–581.
Published: 01 December 1969
... into the hotel dining hall wearing his Bavarian clothes: lederhosen, Bavarian jacket, knee socks, and feathered Bavarian hat -the same costume in which he would appear years later when he lived in New York. On the way to the dining hall, Scharrer and his wife cautiously avoided Graf...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1977) 38 (1): 3–20.
Published: 01 March 1977
...- Such sights as youthful Poets dream On Summer eves by haunted stream. ( 125-30) In the next passage Milton mentions ‘yonson’s learned Sock” (132) as another of the cities’ pleasures. The poet here seems to be following a chain of theatrical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2012) 73 (4): 569–595.
Published: 01 December 2012
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1996) 57 (4): 545–578.
Published: 01 December 1996
... per- version” (DonJuan and th Point of Hm:Seduction, Patriarchal Sock& and Liter7 Tradition, Penn State! Studies in Romance Literatures [Univenity Park Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992 J,76). 30 Schlossman, “Disappearing Acts: Style, Seduction, and Performance in Dom Juan,” MLN...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2017) 78 (2): 139–172.
Published: 01 June 2017
... sorts of plays liked by William Hazlitt or Leigh Hunt, and his classical tragedies did not appeal to twentieth-century critics. Few modern scholars have admired “split-plot tragicomedy” (“One foot the Sock, t’other the Buskin wears . . . Like Volscius , hip-hop, in a single Boot,” as Congreve says in...