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shaftesbury

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (2): 204–206.
Published: 01 June 1959
.... SCHLEGEL.Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Studies in Comparative Literature, No. 15, 1956. Pp. 143. $4.75. Shaftesbury has long enjoyed great prestige in England and on the Continent, and this from several points of view. He has been hailed as an aesthetic fore- runner of romanticism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 65–67.
Published: 01 March 1947
..., is an obvious application of the Platonic concept of heavenly beauty. Plato in Philebus (51-52) lists various aspects of beauty-form, color, sound, smell, knowledge-but not as de- grees. Shaftesbury, however, has a famous classification of three degrees of beauty : first, “the dead forms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (2): 159–180.
Published: 01 June 2015
..., there can be no judgment. Insisting on our capacity for judgment, as figures like Shaftesbury and Fielding do in the early eighteenth century, means taking a stand against the overwhelming sense of necessity and inevitability that dominates philosophical, psychological, sociological, and scientific accounts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (4): 575–579.
Published: 01 December 1993
.... (There is, however, no question of the subtlety and sympathy with which he writes of Shaftesbury.) But when he relates his CH grid to the his- torical circumstances (the “particularsas he does in this book, he shows a remarkable flexibility, and the results project in epitome the most impres- sive history...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 292–309.
Published: 01 September 1951
... that if there were no future state, men would be more miserable than beasts and the best of men would be the most miserable. This doctrine was opposed by a number of moralists, however, who condemned it as a reprehensible mercenary scheme. Led by the Earl of Shaftesbury and Bishop Hoadly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (2): 202–204.
Published: 01 June 1959
... in Comparative Literature, No. 15, 1956. Pp. 143. $4.75. Shaftesbury has long enjoyed great prestige in England and on the Continent, and this from several points of view. He has been hailed as an aesthetic fore- runner of romanticism, a philosophical opponent of Hobbes and of Locke, an ardent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (2): 173–196.
Published: 01 June 2005
... in the shadow of an ancient tradition that he sought both to emulate and to discard. As he wrote late in his career in Tom Jones (1749): “It is horrid puerility to search the heathen theology for any of those deities who have been long since dethroned from their immortal- ity. Lord Shaftesbury observes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 March 1956
... of Winckelmann.8 To Weland’s long-standing admiration for Plato had recently been added an enthusiasm for Shaftesbury. It is difficult to deter- mine the exact time wherl this enthusiasm began. But very early, through his reading of the English moral weeklies and Hagedorn, he had entered...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (3): 251–279.
Published: 01 September 1994
... might dismiss this statement as that of a minor figure working in a minor genre unworthy of mention alongside Shaftesbury, Hutche- son, Hume, Burke, and Kant. Yet, as Walter Benjamin observes, the minor work, the hopelessly flawed instance of a genre, often manifests the most characteristic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (3): 319–322.
Published: 01 September 1953
... Shaftesbury, show in my opinion no parallelism with Diderot’s thought but a most marked difference.) I do not follow the author in his opinion (voiced already by AssCzat) that the abbreviation “M. de M . . .” of the Lettre stands for M. de Marivaux instead of M. de Montesquieu, which Naigeon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (4): 374–375.
Published: 01 December 1954
... accessible in a single, hard-cover volume. Two of the studies (“Shaftesbury and the Ethical Poets in England” and “The Return to Nature in English Poetry of the Eighteenth Century”) have long been recognized as important documents in effecting a significant change in the inter- pretation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (4): 373–374.
Published: 01 December 1954
... four of the five essays that appear under this title are reprints of articles originally published in periodicals more than a quarter-century ago, it is well that we now have them conveniently accessible in a single, hard-cover volume. Two of the studies (“Shaftesbury...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 175–176.
Published: 01 June 1956
... of that volume. In his Introduction Professor Price discusses several topics, most important perhaps the trend of German interest from strictly theological English works in 1700 to most diverse works by 1800, and the incursion into Germany of the philosophical ideas of Shaftesbury and Locke...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 176–177.
Published: 01 June 1956
... into Germany of the philosophical ideas of Shaftesbury and Locke. As everywhere in Price's writings, flashes of sly and.gentle humor illuminate the solid scholarly matter. The bibliography proper lists in 197 pages the German translations and in a few instances the precedent French or Dutch...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 215–216.
Published: 01 June 1961
... of English literary critics and aestheticians. It is of no help to scatter other theological language throughout the text-for example, to link Shaftesbury with “a means of salvation for corrupted mankind,” a dubious association (p. 55). Tuveson’s title represents an attempt to find a unifying...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (3): 225–237.
Published: 01 September 1957
... sanctioned safeguard of the moral and intellectual status quo. This view of ridicule was defended by such men as Shaftesbury and Hutchinson, afid applied by them to the field of literary theory. Young’s apologia for ridicule in his preface to The Universal Passion. and Fielding’s in the preface...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (1): 80–91.
Published: 01 March 1983
... Burnet, and Joseph Addison. In chapter 4, “Shaftesbury: A New Hermetist Prophet,” Tuveson seeks to show (principally through analysis of the dialogue “The Moralists, a Philosophical Rhapsody”) how Shaftes- bury’s ideas both recall the earlier hermetic thinkers and anticipate the thought...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (1): 57–77.
Published: 01 March 2015
... of The Collected Writings of Rousseau , edited and translated by Stuart Philip Vaché Jean . Hanover, NH : University Press of New England . Schneewind J. B. 1998 . The Invention of Autonomy: A History of Modern Moral Philosophy . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Shaftesbury...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (3): 305–316.
Published: 01 September 1967
... as “a versification of the most genuine creed of the time; of that Deism which took various shapes with Clarke, Tindal, and Shaftesbury, and which Bolingbroke seem to have more or less put into shape to be elaborated into poetry by his friend David Daiches sums up the verdicts of many present-day...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 63–69.
Published: 01 March 1943
... line of inheritance, through Cudworth and Clarke, of the English Platonic tradition. Godwin’s tutor at Hoxton, Alexander Kippis, also a friend of Price, was an admirer of Shaftes- bury and contributed a life of Shaftesbury to the Biographia Britan- nica. Godwin himself quotes Shaftesbury more...